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Artist's Opening Reception: Enrico Natali at Joseph Bellows Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 31, 2013
Updated: Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Detroit 1968

Exhibition Dates: 2 November - 21 December, 2013


Opening reception with the artist:

Saturday, November 2

6:00 - 8:00 pm

 

In this the artist's second show a the Joseph Bellows Gallery we pause to look back. In spring of 2012 Bellows exhibited new explorations by Enrico Natali, but these early images of Detroit have acted like a fine wine that has developed character with age. These works have had time to accumulate history and develop intrigue. In Detroit 1968 we enjoy both the perspective of a foundational moment in the artist's career, but also engage layers of history around a city that today is again making headlines.


These works predate the financial collapse of the Motor City, but still trace back to difficult past. Taken just one year after the race riots these images are potent and revealing. There seems to be both tension and calm in the black and white prints, and looking at them over 40 years later we still find a freshness to the frames, the figures, and the socio-cultural climate revealed. So much has changed, so much has stayed the same. The normal goings on of any metropolis are recorded by Natali in images of sporting events, workers, executives, and students. All of the work has an immediacy and an intimacy that connect us to the work and the subjects. We feel rooted and take note of the open exchange between ourselves and the subjects. It is what the work reveals as a whole that gives it the most strength. Images of high-schoolers on their way to prom or ladies decked out in gowns and firs on their way to the Shriner's Convention make us think that times are good and living is easy, while a conflicting story is told in works like East side Detroit family of parents and four children overcrowding their living room couch or Spectators at a public demonstration of three men in suits with what we presume to be a going out of business discount sign hung in the storefront window behind them. The whole body of work moves together to reveal layers of lifestyle, and the promise of the American Dream seems disparate in a city that once promised so much hope for industry and growth of a middle class.


Today these images strike some of the same chords but with deeper resonance as we know what time has brought to Detroit. Perhaps, as we see these works and the city anew, we may start to think on an even bigger scale and envision Detroit as parallel to a greater national experience.


For more information on the exhibition, please visit Joseph Bellows Gallery

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Artist's Opening Reception: Emmet Gowin at Pace/MacGill Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 31, 2013
Updated: Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Landscapes Andalucía


Exhibition Dates: November 7 - January 4, 2014


Opening with the Artist:

Thursday, November 7

5:30 - 7:30 pm

 

Landscapes Andalucía is composed of over 20 pigment prints of aerial views of the Spanish province of Granada, commissioned by FUNDACIÓN MAPFRE in 2012 and presented at Gowin's retrospective there this past summer. The exhibition marks the US debut of these works.

Gowin has been photographing the natural world for over 20 years from above. His interest in this overhead perspective emerged in 1980, when he documented the volcanic devastation following the eruption of Washington's Mount St. Helens from a small plane. Struck by the untouched quality of the terrain and the vast visibility an elevated viewpoint afforded, Gowin proceeded to create a series of aerial photographs over the next two decades.

After what mounted to a decade hiatus Gowin produced a body of work over his hometown of Granada. The work captures the vibrant color of the spanish countryside. Made with a digital camera and gyroscope the flowing fields, tree-lined hills, rugged breaks and badlands become a patchwork before our eyes. The soil variations add great affect to the visual delight and in the buttery afternoon light unexpected forms emerge.

Emmet Gowin received a BFA in Graphic Design from the Richmond Professional Institute (now Virginia Commonwealth University) in 1965 and an MFA in Photography from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1967. Gowin is is the recipient of numerous honors, including a Guggenheim Fellowship (1974), two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships (1977, 1979), and has exhibited internationally at such notable institutions as MOMA, the Corcoran Gallery, the Philadelphia Museum of Art; Yale University Art Gallery, and the Espace Photographie Marie de Paris, among others.

For more information on this exhibition, please visit Pace/MacGill Gallery

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Artist's Opening Reception: Anne Noble at McNamara Gallery

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, October 30, 2013
Updated: Thursday, October 31, 2013

Securing the Shadow


Exhibition Dates: November 8 - 29, 2013


Opening with the Artist:

Friday, November 8

5:30 pm

 

The series Securing the Shadows evolved out of a conversation with a writer, Lloyd Jones about a poem he had written reflecting on the memory of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Jones proposed to exhibiting artist Anne Noble a project in which images of the letterpress would cause reflection on the subject of the poem and the nature of the work itself as artefact.


Noble's work has always had a charge. At times the potency in the work is its quiet, poetic or even void, and in other works we see another side entirely of the artist. Imagery has also been saturated in color and possesses a sensual vibe. While considering the work for Securing the Shadows Noble began by reading accounts of survivors and attached to one in particular in which the survivor described the intensity of the atomic flash as something that …'drained the shadows from the world.' Something in this verbiage connected to to another discovery by Noble- that of nuclear shadows: photographs of the mark made on hard surfaces from where a body or object had been before the blast that in incineration left its ghost image.


This shadow of form translated in the work to printed words as the shadow of memory. These ghostly images hum with energy and absence, they whisper just within audibility; we find ourselves listening for stories in the wind.


For more information on this exhibition, please visit McNamara Gallery

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New Yorker Review: Robert Rauschenberg at Pace MacGill Gallery

Posted By Administration, Monday, October 28, 2013
Updated: Thursday, October 31, 2013

Robert Rauschenberg and Photography


Through November 2, 2013


At the center of his work is the photographic, reproducible image and its infinite possibility for permutation.


This exhibition places places photography at the center of the artist's career. While the output of Rauschenberg's manipulations were not usually photography itself, rather screen prints, collages, and other highbreds, the role of the media has in the past been undervalued. This exhibition works to recontextualize the role of photography on the artist's work. Beyond this the exhibition also reveals the influence of the Bauhaus and its wedding of to truth to materials. Surface and texture are important qualities, so while there are a few straight photographs in the show we also find a selection of work made by alternative processes. We see him pushing and bending the extremes of photography's potential in the series Bleachers, bleached large format Polaroids; Nightshades photographs silkscreened onto aluminum; and Photems, shaped collages of photographs.


For more information on the exhibition please visit Pace MacGill Gallery


New Yorker Review

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New Yorker Review: Lauren Semivan at Bonni Benrubi Gallery

Posted By Administration, Saturday, October 26, 2013
Updated: Thursday, October 31, 2013

OBSERVATORY


Through October 26

 

The haunted interiors of Detroit-based artist Lauren Semivan appear almost as elusive dreams- they seem concrete but half remembered. Semivan's work combines performance, drawing, photography and installation. They also involve memory. Layers of wall drawings for example are reworked- erased or reinvented. The mark of the past, even if erased, still shows signs of presence. This treatment to the drawings seems to be but a symbol for other shifts in the space and Semivan's sense for memory appears also to be somewhat nostalgic. Small postcards mounted on walls seem saved and precious, as do stacks of books, an antique lamp, and a small ship. Semivan's treatment of collected organic samples of leaves, grass, and other flora feel protected and mournful. Often these and other objects are hung as if in an effort to preserve them. Drawings, fabrics, and other atmospheric props swirl as a storm around any delicate object in the frame. The figure appears at times as well, but never wholly or in a confrontational way. The grating anxiety we sometimes feel in these black and white painterly scenes floats between a past that is both romantic and deteriorated, making our present just out of reach. We find ourselves scratching the walls as Semivan does in Labyrinth trying to reach whatever fundamental truth she may be after.


For more information on the exhibition, please visit Bonni Benrubi Gallery


New Yorker Review

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