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Wall Street Journal Review: Fame at Throckmorton Fine Art

Posted By Administration, Friday, August 30, 2013
Updated: Monday, October 14, 2013

Through September 14, 2013

 

Through over 40 vintage prints Throckmorton Fine Art explores the theme, Fame. These portraits span time and reach as far back as 1858 with a Matthew Brady image of Abraham Lincoln and as far forward as a Nicholas Vreeland print of His Holiness the Dalai Lama taken in 2009. Celebrity is something that contemporary culture celebrates with abandon, and photography has played a leading role in the creation of image and solidification of icon. This said, what is perhaps most interesting about this show is that Throckmorton has made an effort to select works that are not well known, and even a few that have never before been printed or publicly shown, so while we do know the subjects we may not have this image of them burned into our memory- yet.


For more information on this exhibition, please visit Throckmorton Fine Art


Wall Street Journal Review:

by William Meyers


Movie stars—Grace Kelly, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall—make up more than a quarter of the 42 famous people pictured at Throckmorton. There are artists aplenty: Frida Kahlo, Jackson Pollock, Georgia O'Keeffe, the deKoonings. Also musicians, a cook—Julia Child—and some political figures.


The range of accomplishment goes from Abraham Lincoln, who saved the Union and freed the slaves, in an 1858 portrait by Mathew Brady, to Jim Morrison of the Doors, who styled himself the "King of Orgasmic Rock," shown making love to a microphone in a picture by Chuck Boyd from the 1970s.


It is difficult—no, impossible—to consider these images without being affected by what you think of the subjects. So Margaret Bourke White's perfectly adequate 1946 picture of Gandhi and his spinning wheel brings to mind Nirad C. Chaudhuri's firsthand reminiscences of the much revered humbug in "The Autobiography of an Unknown Indian."

 

Philippe Halsman's "Duke and Duchess of Windsor" (1930s) reminds me of a similar portrait of themselves that the couple autographed and sent to my ophthalmologist in lieu of paying their bill.


The print of "Che Guevara, Guerrillero Heroico" (1960s) is "signed in ink on recto" by Alberto Korda, but the picture may in fact have been taken by Juan Vivès, an operative of the Dirección General de Inteligencia, the Cuban state-intelligence agency, who defected in 1979. Yousuf Karsh's "Winston Churchill" (1941) is a great portrait of a great man, showing what both capable photographers and inspired leaders can do.


Wall Street Journal Review

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Triple Feature: 3 Coordinated Exhibitions at Steven Kasher Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, August 30, 2013
Updated: Monday, October 14, 2013
Joel Grey, William John Kennedy and Max Kozloff

Exhibition Dates: 
September 12 - October 19, 2013

Opening Receptions and Book Signings
September 12
6:00-8:00 pm

Steven Kasher Gallery opens its Fall season with three coordinated exhibitions. The three solo shows are by Joel Grey, William John Kennedy and Max Kozloff. Each show in its own way depict s New York City as an all-embracing arena where art, performance and the street are in constant creative interaction. In images that span six decades, New York City is revealed as the world's biggest and best museum and theater.

Joel Grey: The Billboard Papers portion of this triple-feature exhibition includes 10 large-scale color photographs of torn and decaying billboards from the streets of New York by the award-winning actor and photographer Joel Grey. The show coincides with the release of The Billboard Papers (Pointed Leaf Press, 2013), Joel Grey's fourth photographic monograph. The photographs resemble paper collages, revealing dramatic and unexpected layers of the billboards' past. As Ross Bleckner writes in the preface: "This is Grey's signature theme: the ephemeral and overlooked evidence of urban development and decay. These photographs are tapestries of embedded memories, constantly fleeting and subject to change, or demolition, or renewal."

The William John Kennedy: WARHOL LOVE INDIANA exhibition features over 20 black & white and color photographs from 1963-64 of Andy Warhol and Robert Indiana by William John Kennedy. Also exhibited will be original early 60s work by Warhol and Indiana, including a 6-foot felt LOVE banner, one of the first versions of Indiana's most iconic image. The show coincides with Robert Indiana's first major retrospective, Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE, at the Whitney Museum September, 26th through January 5th , and with the broadcast debut of a one-hour documentary about Kennedy's photographs, Full Circle: Before They Were Famous.

Max Kozloff: New York Over the Top consists of a collection of 20 color prints drawn from over 35 years of Kozloff's New York photography. Kozloff is a street photographer, alert to the extravagance and sorrows of life in the Big Apple, which he visualizes with idiosyncratic color. Kozloff photographs his fellow citizens with an urban eye. He does not see them as legendary creatures, but he often makes them out to be fabulous presences, glimpsed at carnivals and festivals. He is especially enchanted with that he has called "the music of faces", a spectrum of moods at variance with the consumerism or ethnicity of circumstance. Statues, effigies, or teddy bears seem to offer internal witness to what he calls New York Over the Top.

For more information on these exhibitions please visit Steven Kasher Gallery

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Artist's Reception: Lisa Crowley at McNamara Gallery

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Updated: Monday, October 14, 2013

A Deep Plane


Exhibition Dates: September 6 - 27, 2013


Artist's Opening Reception:

Friday, September 6

5:30 pm

 

Lisa Crowley's earlier work can be described as crisp and elemental; imagery is sleek and minimal, quiet and planar, still it holds the remnants of narrative, the traces of humanity. In her newest body of work, A Deep Plane Crowley considers analogue materiality and its relationship to contemporary ways of looking. The images in the exhibition present the fundamentals of photography as its key subject matter. Grain, tone and luminosity become basic building blocks of her images. In stripping back the photographic image to its most basic form Crowley explores how these material qualities mine both intensive and expansive states of mind.

 

For more information on the exhibition, please visit McNamara Gallery

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Artist's Reception: Pieter Hugo at Yossi Milo Gallery

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 27, 2013
Updated: Monday, October 14, 2013

Kin


Exhibition Dates: September 6 - October 19, 2013


Artist's Reception:

Friday, September 6

6:00 - 8:00 pm

 

In this the artist's forth solo show with Yossi Milo Gallery the artist treads into familiar territory and aims to locate himself and his own young family in South Africa's post-colonial world. This work is very much in-tune with past projects executed in Nigeria, Ghana, Liberia, and Botswana that engage issues of colonization, racial inequity, and widening economic disparity, but these works are closer to home. Through portraiture, still-life, and landscapes Hugo examines, as he describes it, "the failure of the South African colonial experiment and [his] sense of being 'colonial driftwood' ... South Africa is such a fractured, schizophrenic, wounded and problematic place" (Milo press). Hugo admits that while questions like how does one live and navigate in a society with such scaring and can, how, or must history be confronted and responsibility be taken did not bother him so much as they do now that he has started a family.


The work and its complicated narrative does implicate the artist's own family; Hugo presents intimate portraits of his pregnant wife, his daughter moments after her birth, and the domestic servant who has worked for Hugo's family for three generations. Locations and subjects of personal significance, such as cramped townships, contested farmlands, abandoned mining areas and sites of political influence, as well as psychologically charged still lives in people's homes and portraits of drifters and the homeless also compose the series. Alternating between private and public spaces, with a particular emphasis on the growing disparity between rich and poor, Kin is the artist's effort to locate himself and his young family in a country with a fraught history and an uncertain future.

For more information on the exhibition, please visit Yossi Milo Gallery

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Wall Street Journal Review: WET at Laurence Miller Gallery

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 21, 2013
Updated: Monday, October 14, 2013

Through August 23, 2013

 

Laurence Miller Gallery's summer group show, WET is a fun and playful mix of over 40 works by more than 25 artists/photographers. The theme addresses our relationship to water and traces through a range of holdings and reaches through the decades. An 1887 image by Eadweard Muybridge "Woman pouring a bucket of water over another woman," is the oldest work in the show; it is curious and raises many questions, but provides very few answers. Alfred Stieglitz's classic "Steerage" from 1907 reveals the drama and hardships facing immigrants from Europe who crossed the Atlantic to find a better life in the US. However, they are not arriving at Ellis Island but in fact are on their way back, having been denied entry for medical and other reasons. Helen Levitt is represented by four works, including her classic shot of a woman carrying milk bottles, as well as a Jewish dairy sign depicting a woman milking a cow, and a child's drawing of an imagined 5 cent soda. Mid-century work by Fan Ho, "Hong Kong" from 1960 is a memorable and dynamic street scene of umbrellas and pedestrians. Later works like Fred Herzog's 1958 "My Room, Hardwood Street," and Joe Maloney's 1979 "Route 17 Maywood, NJ" use color to sent the tone of their work, and contemporary works too are well represented Julie Mack's "Hotel Lobby France" from 2005 and Burk Uzzle's "White Water Nash" from 2009 speak somewhat to cultural condition. In all this was an interesting and provocative mix of imagery with each work addressing its own relationship to the theme- WET.


Wall Street Journal Review:

by William Meyers


In the summer, galleries present group shows of work culled from their inventories. Because the shows are usually organized around a theme, disparate photographers are hung side by side in unexpected combinations. Miller's theme this summer is "Wet," images somehow related to liquid, so Harold Edgerton's "Milk Drop Sequence" (1938), nine small prints by the MIT electrical engineer who made the stroboscope an instrument for artistic creation, is located not too far from Helen Levitt's "NYC" (c. 1940), a picture of a little girl running from the shower of an open fire hydrant toward the outstretched arm of her mother—two wonderful works made from very different impulses.


The delicacy of "Water Droplets on Flower" (1986-87) by Yasuhiro Ishimoto is countered by the violent surging waves of Dodo Jin Ming's "Free Element V" (2002). There is a sign advertising "5' x 12' Insty Wading Pool $9.88" in Dave Freund's "Gas Station 'Pool'" (late 1970s), but no actual water, unless you count the bucket and squeegee for washing windows on the pole between the pumps. Ray K. Metzker's "Sojourn, France" (1989) features elegant French trees tastefully reflected in an idyllic French stream, and Garry Winogrand's voyeuristic "Hippy Hollow, Lake Travis, Austin, Texas" (1973) is a shot between two trees of a shapely, naked blonde edging into the water. A crumpled mobile home rests upside-down beside a rain-slicked highway in "Crash" (early 1970s) by Michael Becotte, an image that is nothing like Paul Caponigro's meditative aqua-scape "Moonlight/Reflection" (undated).


Wall Street Journal Review


View the exhibition online at Laurence Miller Gallery

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