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New Yorker Review: Gail Albert Halaban at Edwynn Houk Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, December 20, 2012
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014

Hopper Redux
Through December 22, 2012


While the exhibition title sums up the idea behind the work it does little to impress the length to which the artist dedicated herself to this practice. New York-based artist Gail Albert Halaban was greatly influenced by the work of Edward Hopper. Halaban has had a continued interest in the tension between private and public spaces, and in this area Hopper was a significant influence. Hopper's paintings were quite often windows onto the lives of others. The voyeurism embraced by Hopper is described by Halaban as something we all do- peek into open windows, weather we speak of it or not. It is natural to let our eyes wander from the darkness into the lighted frames of windows or haloes of street lamps and wonder- just what is happening.

Hopper Redux is a striking hommage to Halaban's inspiration; she traveled to Gloucester, MA where Hopper once worked. There she traced his footsteps and sought some of the exact locations Hopper had depicted. The work makes viewers do a double-take. There is an uncanny familiarity to the pieces and a clear dedication to detail on the part of Halaban to get the frame, the color, the whole piece just so. We have the strange sensation of looking back and forward in time at the same moment. We recognize and weigh the referent as we are surprised even pleased to see the familiar subject anew. Halaban is careful too to engage the sense of watching- we are happy to discover small narratives taking place between two boys on a street corner in Anderson's House; the exchange between figures in two upper windows of separate buildings in Portuguese Church in Gloucester, 2012; a man on a stoop at dusk in Marty Welch's House, 2012 and others.

For more information on the exhibition, please visit Edwynn Houk Gallery

New Yorker Review

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Artist's Reception: Charlotte Dumas at Julie Saul Gallery

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 19, 2012
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014

Anima

Exhibition Dates: January 10 - March 9, 2013

Reception for the Artist
Thursday, January 10th
6:00 - 8:00 pm


In November aipad reported on Charlotte Dumas' Book release of Repose; we write again on the artist's work and on her forthcoming exhibition with Julie Saul Gallery. Anima the artist's latest series was commissioned by and recently exhibited at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. The series focuses on the burial horses of Arlington National Cemetery. The horses are noble and graceful. Their dark eyes watch us knowingly, their coats distinguish their character. We find them in their stalls after a day's hard work. Dumas' choice to use available light allows the fold of intimacy to wrap around viewer and subject- we feel as she must have in the moment. We are surprised even to feel this trusting connection between ourself and the horses of Arlington. True to all her work, Dumas' images seems to bridge the gap of communication between man and animal. Her honest approach allows us to move even beyond personification of her subjects.

For more information please visit Julie Saul Gallery

November 27, 2012
Book Release:Repose by Charlotte Dumas

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Memorial Exhibition: Bonni's Best

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 19, 2012
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014

A Memorial Exhibition for Bonni Benrubi

Exhibition Dates: January 11 - January 26, 2013

Opening Reception & Memorial:
Friday January 11th
6:00 - 9:00pm


As a testament to her personal dedication and years of work Bonni Benrubi built one of the most highly celebrated photography galleries and photography collections in New York. The Memorial Exhibition, Boni's Best, to be visual celebration of the dealer's life, work, and personal collection. Selections from Mrs. Benrubi's personal collection to accompany iconic images drawn from the gallery's 25 year history for a memorial exhibition.

Mrs. Benrubi began her career in photography in 1977 at the Daniel Wolf Gallery. She continued to make great strides in the field, working as Director of Wolf Gallery until 1987 and after leaving began private dealing, eventually opening a public gallery in 1992. Mrs. Benrubi championed the careers of contemporary artists including Abelardo Morell, Massimo Vitali and Matthew Pillsbury and can also be credited for her work helping international collectors grow their collections.

Family, friends, and staff to unite at the Opening Reception and Memorial to remember Bonni Benrubi.

Please visit Bonni Benrubi Gallery for further information.

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Wall Street Journal Review: Throckmorton Fine Art

Posted By Administration, Saturday, December 15, 2012
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014

Director's Cut: Celebrating Kraige Block's Fifteenth Anniversary as Director

Through January 5, 2013


There is a natural ease to the works selected by Kraige Block for his Director's Cut exhibition. A timeless sense surrounds the works and makes them all seem fresh. Dating from the present to 1920 even iconic images are seen anew. Block has been with the gallery for fifteen years and this selection is a set of personal favorites from the over 80 exhibitions he has organized.

A leader in the field of Latin American Photography it is no surprise to find a healthy selection of Latin artists, including Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Flor Garduño, and Luis Gonzalez Palma, alongside foreigners who worked in Latin America like Edward Weston, Tina Modotti and Nickolas Muray. All of the included artists have been influential to the field of photography, and all of them have left a mark on the generations of artists and appreciative public.

It is easy to see why these works have been so impactful. Each image is visually seductive. Often our eye is enticed by the natural beauty of the figure- the eyes of Fritz Henle's Portait of Nieve sentice, the bare body of Lucien Clergue's Nu Zebre and Gao Yuan's Untitled (Woman with book) spread out invitingly, the visage of an old woman Face with Fish by Javier Silva Meinel haunts, and the portrait of Frida Kahlo 'Classic' by Nickolas Muray is slowly piercing. The natural world plays into some of the aforementioned images and others as well and a thread of belonging weaves between works in a delightful way.

For more information on the exhibition, please visit Throckmorton Fine Art


Wall Street Journal Review:
by William Meyers

Director's Cut: Celebrating Kraige Block's Fifteenth Anniversary as Director

Throckmorton specializes in Latin American fine-art photography, so it is not surprising that Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Graciela Iturbide and Flor Garduño are among Kraige Block's favorites. The gallery director also includes foreigners who worked south of the Rio Grande, such as Edward Weston, Tina Modotti and Nickolas Muray. The pictures run from the 1920s to last year, but modernism is a constant strain throughout. About one-third of them have flora or fauna as important elements in their images, and it is only natural that Frida Kahlo—the unavoidable presence of 20th-century Mexican art—should be seen in two portraits. Mr. Muray's 1939 color picture of Ms. Kahlo is justifiably called "Classic": the ample red scarf draped around her shoulders, the eyebrows, the stance: It is quintessentially Kahloesque. Ms. Bravo's 1943 black-and-white candid of Ms. Kahlo on a bed seems to have been taken through a ceiling trapdoor.

Six of the 34 picks are by Mr. Weston, and they include "Pepper No. 35" (1930), no less startling today than it was more than 80 years ago. In Fritz Henle's "Portrait of Nieves" (1943), the bottom of her face is hidden behind an enormous leaf, so what we mostly see are her eyes—but Nieves, who was Diego Rivera's model, had delightfully sensual eyes. Why the naked woman in Javier Silva Meinel's "Arahuana, Iquitos, Peru" (2004) has one of the big fish wrapped around her neck, I have no idea.

Wall Street Journal Review

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Gitterman Gallery Has Moved

Posted By Administration, Thursday, December 13, 2012
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014

Now located at
41 East 57th Street, Suite 1103
New York, NY 10022

Opening with work by Kenneth Josephson

Opening Reception:
Thursday, January 10
6:00 - 8:00 pm

Exhibition Dates: January 11 - March 16, 2013


picsFor over 20 years the Gitterman Gallery has remained committed to presenting the best in photography. In addition to representing artists, estates, and private collections, the gallery maintains a critical yet broad-reaching inventory of work that spans the history of the medium. With a hearty stock of well known samples by established artist the gallery also strives to gain attention for artists they feel have been overlooked by history.

The gallery will reopen at their new location with work by Kenneth Josephson. Josephson was one of the first in the generation of photographers to earn a graduate degree in photography. After studying with Minor White at the Rochester Institute of Technology he went onto study with Aaron Siskind and Harry Callahan at the Illinois Institute of Design and it was there he earned his graduate degree. What Josephson took he gave- for over 35 years he taught photography at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago training two generations of artists. Josephson himself had a fruitful career as an artist and was a leader in conceptual photography. The highly decorated Josephson was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship Grant and two NEA grants.


For more information on the artist or new gallery location please visit Gitterman Gallery

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