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5% Boost in the Arts

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 11, 2012
Updated: Monday, December 16, 2013
As we evaluate the numbers of the 5% increase in Obama's 2013 proposed budget spending for arts and culture we may find that intent and symbol fall a bit short. The targets of the proposed increase include Washington, D.C. arts institutions and cultural grant-making agencies. More often than not funding levels are up but still below the slashes made by Congressional Republicans back in 2011. We are in a two steps back, one step forward situation. While the move is a good, kind, and rightful gest many institutions will continue to struggle to make ends meet.

For more informaiton on this story please visit LA Times

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Photographer's Gallery Gets a New Home

Posted By Administration, Thursday, February 23, 2012
Updated: Monday, December 16, 2013

Public Opening May 19, 2012


With the support of the Arts Council England's Lottery Fund and a strong group of Trusts, Foundations, corporates and individuals the £8.9 project has been completed. The internationally acclaimed institution features native and international artists and its new home, twice the size of the old venue, allows greater exhibition space and broader platform. Acclaimed Irish architects O'Donnell + Tuomey created a fluid and dynamic environment with a two story extension, environmentally-controlled floor, and plenty of room for oversize and moving image works.

For more information and images of construction please visit The Photographer's Gallery

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Auction Sales on the Rise Despite Royalty Charges

Posted By Administration, Saturday, February 11, 2012
Updated: Monday, December 16, 2013

A healthy market even with trimming


Though protest to the recently enacted royalties charge on resales continues, auction houses are expecting record profits. Royalties charges that apply to art resales, much the same as in the music industry, began to take effect in January and are being expanded. The newest modification to the royalties measure includes European artists who died in the past 70 years, so a whole new group of major masters are now subject to charges. As it stands a sliding scale of charges applies to resales: 4% on works between 1,000 - 50,000 Euros down to 0.25% on sales over 2 million with a cap of 12,500 Euros. Dealers continue to attack the measure at all ends by asking the government to raise the minimum and going over their heads to the European Commission.

There is an encouraging lining to all of this discussion; the auction houses are doing well. Surprisingly, sales for both Christie's and Sotheby's were up about 14% from the year before. The upswing is encouraging, and with both houses planning major auctions in the next few days all eyes will be on the gavel. The poor economic climate is being tributed for investors turning to art as an alternative to more traditional investments, but still welcome news to dealers, collectors, and artists.

For more information on this story, please visit ArtLyst

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Yasuhiro Ishimoto Dies at 90

Posted By Administration, Thursday, February 9, 2012
Updated: Monday, December 16, 2013
A Legend in His Own Time

The Japanese-American photographer, Yasuhiro Ishimoto, enjoyed a long and fruitful career as a photographer on both sides of the Pacific.
Born to Japanese-American farmers in San Francisco in 1921 Ishimoto spent his life between the United States and Japan. At age three his family returned to Japan. Ishimoto was raised in Kochi City, and followed in his parent's footsteps, graduating from an Agricultural High School. In 1939 he returned to the United States to study agriculture at the University of California and continued onto Chicago where began his artistic path. Ishimoto first studied architecture at Northwestern University, though he did not complete this degree architecture remained an important topic in his work and influence on his composition.

From 1942-1944 Ishimoto was held in an internment camp alongside other Japanese Americans; it was here he began to engage photography and learn the photographic process. In 1946 Ishimoto flirted further with the media and joined an amateur photographer club, Photo Dearborn. Two years later, in 1948, he met Harry Shigeta and began to pursue the media seriously; the same year he enrolled in the Institute of Design where he studied with Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, and Gordon Coster. In his time as a student and after Ishimoto captured the world around him. While in Chicago the city became a favorite theme. From boldly constructed frames- the people, the architecture, the cars to the quiet and simple- the trace and fragment of humanity and nature Ishimoto took everything in. Though he returned to Japan in 1961 Ishimoto gave tribute to the city he had called home in his first publication, Chicago, Chicago, published in 1969.

Ishimoto continued to photograph, publish, exhibit, and teach photography with great note and recognition in the United States, Japan, and beyond. Significant accomplishments are many, some include: two Moholy-Nagy Prizes; Edward Steichen selections to exhibit at MoMA; a solo shows at the Art Institute of Chicago; a retrospective at Seibu Museum of Art in Tokyo; a Minolta fellowship; and the title Man of Cultural Distinction by the Japanese government.

Ishimoto passed away this week, February 6, 2012.

For further information on this story please visit The Mainichi Daily News

Yasuhiro Ishimoto's work is represented by aipad member Stephen Daiter Gallery in Chicago. For further information on the artist and his work please contact the Stephen Daiter Gallery

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Prado Museum Extends Hours to Offset Government Cutbacks

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 26, 2012
Updated: Monday, December 16, 2013

Record attendance means little when balanced against the international economic crisis.


The Prado Museum in Madrid will join a select group of international museums, including The National Gallery in London and the Rijksmuseum in the Netherlands, and open seven days a week. Despite high attendance rates and lines at the door museums have inevitably been affected by the global economic crisis and cutbacks at all ends mean museums are left to cover the decreased subsidies themselves. Half of the Prado's anual budget came from public subsidies, but that figure has been reduced by 20%. Set at one end of Madrid's "Golden Triangle" the two other pinnacles, the Reina Sofia and the Thyssen-Bornemisa, are also investigating extending hours.

More information on this story here.

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