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Review: Pieter Hugo at Milo Gallery

Posted By Administration, Monday, September 12, 2011
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014
DATE: September 12, 2011

Permanent Error

Through October 29, 2011


"Heartbreaking" can not begin to describe the apocalyptic images of Agbogbloshie, a dumpsite for technological waste outside the capital city of Ghana. The tale of even one worker scavenging the heaps of leftover computer, phone, and game bits would be disheartening, but Pieter Hugo's new work offers striking glimpse into the life and world that is reality to many in the area. Western "donations" are scavenged in toxic process for bits of copper, brass, aluminum, and zinc for resale, and the meager living afforded by the dangerous work in no way seems worth the risk. Men, women, and children are seen combing through remains, black noxious smoke billowing on dead landscapes. There is a strong and lasting dignity to the figures, a quiet calling out in their eyes, emotion is strong, pain is deep, and the images will last if not haunt. Reflection on our rhythm of consumption and dumping of what have become everyday electronics is demanded.

One cannot describe these sites, the work must be seen and felt.

For more on the exhibition please visit Yossi Milo Gallery

Text available through the gallery.

New Yorker Review




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Review: Elijah Gowin at Robert Mann Gallery

Posted By Administration, Monday, September 12, 2011
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014

DATE: September 12, 2011

 

Into the Sun

Through October 22, 2011


Image
Elijah Gowin, Into the Sun 12, Courtesy
of RobertMann Gallery
 
Image
Elijah Gowin, Into the Sun 7, Courtesy
of Robert Mann Gallery
 
Image
Elijah Gowin, Into the Sun 27, Courtesy
of Robert Mann Gallery
 
The work of Elijah Gowin has taken interest in belief, ritual, and memory. The construction of the photgraphic image, the quality of material has also been important to his work. Into the Sun has reduced the artists' interest to its most refined element- light and the sun itself.

Pointing skyward Gowin's images capture effects of lens flairs and distortions that alter the regular appearance of the ball of light in the sky. At times surroundings enter and remind us of the life-power the sun has supported, sustained, given root to. In life, we could never be afforded the glimpses Gowin gives us, as to look into the sun risks blinding the gazer. Here we are allowed to look, to linger, to stare into the very belly of life and we feel an overwhelming calm. The moment and sensation linger, we transcend space and time and are able to contemplate the source of creation as we look deep into its very soul.

New Yorker Review

Robert Mann Gallery


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Joel Meyerowitz: Memorial Exhibition at Houk Gallery

Posted By Administration, Monday, September 12, 2011
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014
DATE: September 12, 2011

September 10 - September 17, 2011

Tribute to Tragedy and Renewal.


Image
Joel Meyerowitz, January 1, 1983, Courtesy of Houk Gallery
 
Image
Joel Meyorwitz, A crane being erected on the corner of
West and Liberty, October 11, 2001, Courtesy of Houk Gallery
 
Image
Joel Meyerowitz, Flags on the façade of the World
Financial Center, September 23, 2001, Courtesy of Houk Gallery
 
The brief memorial show at Edwynn Houk Gallery is a critical marker in time- the 10 year anniversary of the September 11 attacks. One of the only photographers permitted entry to Ground Zero, Joel Meyerwitz, documented the aftermath of the World Trance Center attack for 9 months. In all over 8,000 images were made to record events that tribute the work and bravery of firefighters, police, and construction workers and show the slow transformation of the site from disaster area to level ground. The images have been seen by over 4 million people in more than 200 cities around the globe. The project was sponsored by the Museum of the City of New York which holds digital files in their archives.

Works are grand and layered deep with emotion- sorrow, loss, but also hope. The power and strength of America is embedded in the work and inspiration raises from the ashes of destruction.

New Yorker Mention

Edwynn Houk Gallery


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Artist's Reception: Jeri Eisenberg at John Cleary Gallery

Posted By Administration, Monday, September 12, 2011
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014
DATE: September 12, 2011

Bokeh
"Aesthetic Quality of the Blur"

Opening Reception with the Artist
Saturday, September 17, 2011
6:00 - 8:00 pm

Exhibition through October 15


Image
In her latest addition to an ongoing series Sojourn in Seasons: Sketching with Light Amongst Trees Eisenberg engages a vision that is both revealing and obscured. Exhibition title Bokeh or in Japanese the term for the "aesthetic quality of the blur" is effective in relating to the work on levels deeper its appearance.

What enchants in the work also frustrates- our delight in delicate depictions of spring and summer foliage also inspires a desire to read the image with clarity, to bring beauty to focus. Images were made with an oversized pinhole lens chosen with the intention of capturing a blurred vision that distorts the recognizable. Knowledge of the artis' inspiration enhances our understanding- the work began in reaction to her father's loss of vision and memory. We look at the pieces anew with profound reverence. We find elegance and joy in the work. We feel thankful for what we do have and discover a renewed desire to take pause, to appreciate the simple things in life.

For more information on the exhibition, the artist, or works exhibited, please visit John Cleary Gallery

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Artists' Reception: Matthew Brandt at M+B Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 9, 2011
Updated: Thursday, January 2, 2014
DATE: September 9, 2011

Two Ships Passing

Artists' Opening: Friday, September 16
6:00 - 8:00 pm

Exhibition Dates: Sept. 16 - Oct. 29, 2011


Matthew Brandt explores the interdependence between the United States and China in his exhibition Two Ships Passing. The expression is multi-layered, so too is the work created with the concept in mind. Themes of potential, promise, need, aspiration, progress are explored in the work.

Image
One area Brandt leaves untouched are points of dispute, arguments between the giants. There are many planes the two countries do not meet on, do not see eye to eye on, but these intersections are not explored directly in the work, rather may evolve because of the work in the mind of the viewer.

The space between at points of intersection is stage for the work and is first explored with images of ships passing each other in their own domestic waters. Large format salt prints are made with the very waters they depict and the construction folds thoughtfully onto concept. As we look at ships on the horizon we are more aware of the gap between vessels than in their chance of meeting. The prints have an eery calm, a quiet watching and waiting, a sense too of normalcy, repetition, and dependance. It is as if the space is desired, sacred, even protected by the passing ships. An uneasy tension develops in our own minds.

A more electric work pushes the envelope and reinforces sense of need for protective distance as it reinforces litteral connectivity. Entering the gallery viewers are greeted with a sign, "For your safety do not touch the artwork." Exposed current runs through etched copper picture planes and circuit boards are photographs of Mao Zedong's birthplace, Hunan China. The charge continues past a set of C-prints and onto an original Edison Company light bulb. Once the sign of American ingenuity and manufacturing power, the contemporary counterpart to this relic is now made in China.

Two Ships Passing resonates in segments and holistically with strong and profound tone, speaking in one moment to past and present. As realities of Two Ships Passing evolves fully in our mind we wonder at looming futures.

For more information please visit M+B Gallery


Image
This exhibition is part of Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945–1980, a Getty initiative that brings together more than sixty cultural institutions from across Southern California to examine the history of contemporary art in Los Angeles.

Visit Pacific Standard Time for more information on this and other events.

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