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Review: Mohamed Bourouissa at Yossi Milo

Posted By Administration, Sunday, June 6, 2010
Updated: Friday, December 20, 2013

DATE: June 6, 2010

 

A French photographer whose work was included in the New Museum's "Younger Than Jesus" exhibition, in 2009, makes his New York gallery début with a knockout group of large-scale color images that could almost pass for photojournalism.


Image
Mohamed Bourouissa, La fenêtre, 2005, © Mohamed
Bourouissa, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
and Galeries Les Filles du Calvaire, Paris
 
Bourouissa's subjects are the African and Arab youths of Paris's explosive banlieues, seen in charged encounters, usually between groups of boys on the street. The standoffs are staged and carefully lit, but the tension still crackles, especially in one big picture, where a scattering crowd looks poised between celebration and riot. Strikingly topical when they were made, Bourouissa's photographs still pack a punch.

From The New Yorker.


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Review: Joe Szabo at Gitterman Gallery

Posted By Administration, Sunday, June 6, 2010
Updated: Friday, December 20, 2013
DATE: June 6, 2010

Szabo, whose empathetic photographs of Long Island teen-agers have attracted a cult following, shows pictures made at Jones Beach during the past four decades, along with shots of fans at a 1978 Rolling Stones concert.


Image
Joseph Szabo, Embrace, Jones Beach, 2007, ©
Joseph Szabo, Courtesy Gitterman Gallery
 
His choice of black-and-white film aligns him with such photographers as Danny Lyon and William Klein. Like them, Szabo tends to be an engaged observer, with a particular interest in the fleeting pleasures and pains of the young. At Jones Beach, he's always attuned to body language and his keen eye for personal style turns many of the rock-concert shots into great, if unintentional, fashion photographs.

From The New Yorker

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Review: Man Ray at Edwynn Houk

Posted By Administration, Sunday, June 6, 2010
Updated: Friday, December 20, 2013

DATE: June 6, 2010

 

There are a number of famous photographs in this exhibition of Man Ray's work from Paris: Nancy Cunard, her arms stacked with African bracelets; Peggy Guggenheim, cigarette holder aloft; Max Ernst reflected in shattered glass.


Image
Man Ray, Rayograph (Project pour une tapisserie),
1925-26, © Man Ray Trust, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery
 
But many more are less familiar, and all of them look especially brilliant—and definitively avant-garde—in this elegant installation. Along with these iconic portraits are male and female nudes, a rich array of the abstract photograms the artist called rayographs, and a 1975 sequence of segmented wooden dolls posed before a grainy TV screen which could earn him a place among the Pictures Generation.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: American Photo Illustration Exhibit at Keith de Lellis

Posted By Administration, Saturday, May 29, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

DATE: May 29, 2010

 

The not so fine line between kitsch and art gets blurred repeatedly in this canny, diverting exhibition, "Artifice: Photo Illustration in America circa 1925-1960." The exhibit features staged and manipulated images by Anton Bruehl, Edward Steichen, George Hoyningen-Huene, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, and a slew of other successful editorial and advertising photographers.


While there's little subtlety involved in the product pitches (an early console radio appears to levitate before its astonished owner), their visual inventiveness covers a broad range of pre-Photoshop strategies, from rear projection to photomontage. Whether sophisticated or vulgar, these photographs set a lively precedent for Gregory Crewdson, Erwin Olaf, and other contemporary creators of photo-fictions.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: "Between the Bricks and the Blood: Transgressive Typologies" at Steven Kasher

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, April 27, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: April 27, 2010

This exhibition of photographs in grids and groups is not the academic exercise its title might suggest. Instead, it's another engagingly eccentric example of this gallery's penchant for unlikely and provocative combinations.


Nine of Bernd and Hilla Becher's industrial views hang alongside twenty-four mug shots of crudely bandaged suspects, which face Mapplethorpe's head shots of nine SoHo art dealers. Emory Douglas's arresting covers of the newspaper The Black Panther are next to Alexandra Penney's spooky photographs of recently foreclosed homes in Maine. Some of the best work is anonymous or newly discovered; all of it is lively and unexpected.

From The New Yorker.

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