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Joann Verburg at Pace MacGill

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, April 27, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: April 27, 2010

Verburg's color photographs of the Italian town of Spoleto are not the views of a tourist. She's so familiar with these narrow passages, painted plaster walls, and bricked-up archways that her pictures feel intimate, loving.


She glides past spots in a haze of pleasure and remembrance, allowing areas of her pictures to slip out of focus, as if in a swoon or a daydream. Seen through her eyes, the town is a marvellous maze, empty save for the almost palpable presence of the photographer's avid eye.

Three small head shots of people on the street stand in for the otherwise absent population, but you almost resent their intrusion on Verburg's reverie.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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"The Heartbeat of Fashion" Exhibit at Howard Greenberg

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, April 20, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: April 20, 2010

For a show inspired by the German photographer and collector F. C. Gundlach's book of the same name, the gallery pulls pictures from its vast inventory that question the conventional definition of a fashion photograph.


Here, it's broad enough to include a 1922 news photo of Babe Ruth and Bob Meusel looking sporty in newsboy caps, Brassaï's 1932 image of a chic lesbian couple, and Bruce Davidson's shot of a man selling Muhammad Speaks in 1962. Seen alongside some great fashion shots by Avedon, Penn, Steichen, and Gundlach himself, these images of personal style help open up a genre that's always been far more various than it gets credit for.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Pieter Hugo at Yossi Milo

Posted By Administration, Monday, April 12, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: April 12, 2010

The South African photographer's previous work with itinerant performers and their trained animals led him to a series of far freakier "Nollywood" pictures—portraits of bit players in Nigeria's booming low-budget film industry.


In his latest series, Hugo poses bizarrely costumed actors on busy streets and empty lots, creating funny, gory tableaux that are surreal. A man covered in hair sits at a café with a bottle of Coke; three children in white body paint (pint-size zombies) hang out in a field; a doleful-looking woman sits on an unmade bed, the bloody knife between her breasts sticking out her back.

From The New Yorker.




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"Pioneers of Color" Exhibit at Edwynn Houk

Posted By Administration, Monday, April 12, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: April 12, 2010

Although this exhibition was clearly designed as a showcase for Joel Meyerowitz (whom the gallery represents), with Stephen Shore and William Eggleston in supporting roles, that's not an issue when there are so many great photographs in the room.


All three men used color in the nineteen-sixties and seventies, when art photography was strictly black-and-white. The work doesn't look dated. On the contrary, much of it looks better than ever: crisp, brilliant, effortlessly cool. Their snapshot-style sensibility was Pop, and their pictures of the American social landscape merge celebration with critique as seamlessly as anything by Warhol or Rosenquist.

From The New Yorker.

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Andy Warhol at Steven Kasher Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, April 1, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

DATE: April 1, 2010

 

Warhol is a seemingly inexhaustible source of art and artifacts, and this large group of smallish black-and-white snapshots—previously unexhibited outtakes from his 1979 book, "Andy Warhol's Exposures"—falls somewhere between the two.


Although many of these images are indistinguishable from the usual hit-and-run party pictures (prime locale: Studio 54), their subjects still command attention, especially when combined: O. J. Simpson and Marisa Berenson, Susan Sontag and Gloria Vanderbilt, Mick Jagger and Catherine Deneuve.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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