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Dennis Darzacq at Laurence Miller

Posted By Administration, Sunday, March 7, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: March 7, 2010

Suspended in midair, the young subjects of this French photographer's big color pictures appear to be levitating in the otherwise unpopulated aisles of supermarkets.


Surrounded by shelves of colorful products, bathed in chilly florescent light, they're in an ecstatic, zero-gravity bubble, and you can't help but envy them. As with Darzacq's previous photographs of parkour daredevils floating high above the sidewalk, there's no Photoshop manipulation involved in these pictures of street dancers in action.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Joshua Lutz at Robert Koch

Posted By Administration, Sunday, March 7, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: March 7, 2010

New York photographer Joshua Lutz presents works from two series, "Meadowlands" and "AmStarDam."


Image
Joshua Lutz, Untitled, 2009, © Joshua Lutz, Courtesy Robert Koch Gallery
 
The first, which sprang from Lutz's curiosity about labor leader Jimmy Hoffa's still unexplained disappearance, looks at the Jersey meadows, the vast stretch of New Jersey marshland familiar to anyone who has traveled between Manhattan and Newark Airport. Lutz never found Hoffa, but he did happen on a corpse, face down in the water, and recorded it with sober ambiguity in "Body" (2007).

"Body" nearly unbalances Lutz's show by forcefully reawakening qualms about the camera as, in some sense, a death-dealing instrument.

Read the complete review in The San Francisco Chronicle.


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Aaron Siskind at Alan Klotz Gallery

Posted By Turner Uligian, Sunday, March 7, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

DATE: March 7, 2010

 

Forty black-and-white photographs dating from 1938 to 1985 emphasize the marvellous range and consistency of Siskind's Abstract Expressionist work.


Image
Aaron Siskind, Chicago 206, 1953/1980, Courtesy Alan Klotz Gallery
 
Isolating and framing tar-splattered patches of pavement, weathered planks, flaking plaster, torn posters, and other marked-up urban surfaces, he recognized the equivalent to Pollock, de Kooning, and Motherwell's gestural freedom in anonymous found materials. A 1973 series that zeroes in on broad swaths of smeared paint is titled "Homage to Franz Kline," but most of Siskind's work finds its own vivacious language in graffiti, rust, or peeling paper. Once you learn it, the world will never look the same

From The New Yorker.


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Lauren E. Simonutti at Catherine Edelman Galler

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 19, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: February 19, 2010

Lauren E. Simonutti's black-and-white images depict meticulously staged representations of life as she experiences it, starring herself as the main character.


Image
Lauren E. Simonutti, A, is where is all began, 2007,
Courtesy of Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago
 
In 2006, the Baltimore-based artist was diagnosed with rapid-cycling bipolar and schizoaffective disorder and since then she has lived alone, in "self-imposed isolation," taking photographs in a house where none of the clocks tell time correctly––a house that is, for Simonutti, a haven, a stage set, a performer, and a collaborator.

Using sheets to create drapes, walls, and screens, she turns a single small corner of her home into theatrical sets and Surrealist tableaux.

Read the complete review in Artforum.


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Richard Misrach at Pace/MacGill

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 19, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: February 19, 2010

Misrach continues to amaze, with a group of massive photographs whose color has been digitally altered.


Some of his images (a streamlined dune and its reflection, tangled brambles in closeup, broad seascapes) may be familiar, but their colors aren't—they've been computer-manipulated and reversed. The results resemble negatives but have an uncanny, sci-fi quality. Are we on the dark side of the moon? Towering rocks at the beach look like chipped crystal; a dead tree is cast in silvery tones, like a Roxy Paine sculpture. This is nature through the looking glass, as alarming as it is alluring.

From The New Yorker.

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