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Robert Voit at Amador Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 19, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: February 19, 2010

Yet another graduate of the Düsseldorfer Akademie (fellow-alumni include Thomas Struth and Andreas Gursky) carries on the spirit of Bernd and Hilla Becher in witty, deadpan color photographs of what appear to be unusually tall and neatly trimmed trees.


Image
Robert Voit, Mono Lake, California, USA, 2006,
©Robert Voit, Courtesy of Amador Gallery
 
They are, in fact, carefully camouflaged supports for cellular antennae, disguised to look like pines, palms, and cacti in South Africa, Italy, Israel, and the U.S., among other locations. Voit places these "new trees" in the center of his frame so that the images have the uniform look of product shots, but they're far from boring.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Jacob Aue Sobol at Yossi Milo

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 19, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: February 19, 2010

In two complementary series of black-and-white photographs, this Danish photographer immerses us in a dark, erotic, and occasionally violent world a lot like the one we've seen in pictures by Daido Moriyama, J. H. Engstrom, Anders Petersen, and other frequenters of the lower depths.


Image
Jacob Aue Sobol, Untitled #10, From the series I,
Tokyo (2006-2008), © Jacob Aue Sobol, Courtesy
Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
 
Whether he's photographing his girlfriend, Sabine, in Greenland or random strangers in Tokyo, Aue Sobol's blunt realism often gives way to something dreamlike, even nightmarish.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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William Christenberry at Hemphill Fine Arts

Posted By Administration, Thursday, February 18, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: February 18, 2010

William Christenberry, who is 73, has been one of Washington's most important artists for something like 40 years, working as a painter, fine-art photographer, meticulous sculptor and careful installer of found things.

 

Image
William Christenberry, Bar-B-Q Inn, Greensboro,
Alabama, 1977, Vintage Kodak Brownie, Courtesy
of the Artist and Hemphill Fine Arts
 
But the best way back to the origins of all his varied work, and to the heart of what it means, is through a series of scrappy little snapshots that Christenberry made in the 1970s, shooting with a Kodak Brownie and getting his prints done at drugstore photo counters as he toured and contemplated Hale County, Ala., where his family is from.

Read the complete review in The Washington Post.

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Diane Arbus and Robert Gober at Fraenkel Gallery

Posted By Administration, Monday, January 25, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

San Francisco photography dealer Jeffrey Fraenkel has played host in his gallery to artists as little identified with photography as Sol LeWitt, Christian Marclay and Steve Wolfe.

 

With " 'Christ in a Lobby' and Other Unknown or Almost Known Works by Diane Arbus," Fraenkel gallery breaks new ground again by inviting New York sculptor Robert Gober to choose an exhibition from among 200 prints, seldom or never published before, made available to the gallery by the Arbus Estate.Read the complete review and interview with Robert Gober in The San Francisco Chronicle.

Diane Arbus, Girl emerging from the ocean in curlers,

Coney Island, N.Y., 1963, © 1980 The Estate of Diane Arbus LL

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William Christenberry at Pace MacGill

Posted By Administration, Monday, January 25, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

DATE: January 25, 2010

William Christenberry at Pace MacGill Works in several mediums, including color photography, painting, and drawing, continue Christenberry's ongoing documentation of buildings and landscapes in rural Alabama.

 

The artist's dedication to his subjects—decrepit survivors of the vernacular architecture that previously absorbed Walker Evans—is matched by his affection for them. One remarkable structure is seen collapsing over a period of twenty-seven years, along with the car in its front yard; a scale model of the same house, which Christenberry built from memory, sits on a pedestal nearby.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker

 

 William Christenberry, House and Car, near Akron,

Alabama, 1981, © William Christenberry, Courtesy

Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York

 

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