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Massimo Vitali at Bonni Benrubi

Posted By Administration, Monday, January 25, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: January 25, 2010

Massimo Vitali at Bonni Benrubi


Vitali is famous for his huge color photographs of Europeans at the beach—landscapes of leisure that are as big as history paintings but a lot more matter-of-fact.


Image
Massimo Vitali, Scala dei Turchi Island, Sicily, 2009, © Massimo Vitali / Courtesy Bonni Benrubi Gallery, NYC
No drama, no narrative, just the sand, the sea, and a scattering of people carefully and coolly observed. These summer scenes, from Sicily and Turkey, make Vitali's show a welcome getaway on chilly days. His elevated, omniscient perspective (he usually works from a raised platform) takes the work out of the realm of tourist snaps and closer to that of Thomas Struth, especially in views of ancient sites in Turkey.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Martin Denker at Bruce Silverstein

Posted By Turner Uligian, Monday, January 25, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: January 25, 2010

Martin Denker at Bruce Silverstein


Denker's huge color photographs would not exist without the latest digital technology. Although there are bits of recognizable photographic subjects here, they've been whipped up into a dazzling, chaotic concoction that has very little foothold in reality.


Image
Martin Denker, CandylandTV, 2008, © Martin Denker, Courtesy Bruce SIlverstein Gallery, NYC.

 

The insanely dense results, which involve as many as fifty layers of interpenetrating images, are as busy, elastic, and entertaining as cartoons. What they most resemble are super-slick versions of the comics and concert posters drawn in the sixties by Victor Moscoso and Rick Griffin, but there are no apparent narratives here.


Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Homer Page at Howard Greenberg

Posted By Administration, Monday, January 25, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: January 25, 2010

Since it opened, in 1986, this gallery has been known for reviving the work of forgotten or overlooked photographers. Homer Page (1918-85) is the latest of these rediscoveries.


Image
Homer Page, New York, June 28, 1949, courtesy
Howard Greenberg Gallery
 
He has a lot in common with earlier ones (notably Leon Levinstein and Saul Leiter), including wit, grit, and an instinctive feel for the staccato rhythms and poetic passages of urban life. Page's show is devoted to the pictures he made on a Guggenheim Fellowship in New York in 1949—classic street work, full of spirit.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Tina Modotti at Throckmorton

Posted By Turner Uligian, Monday, January 25, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013
DATE: January 25, 2010

This show of more than forty photographs, taken in Mexico between 1923 and 1930, is a welcome reminder that Modotti's cult status is based on a substantial body of work, not just on her history of lovers, controversies, and Communist sympathies.


Image
Tina Modotti, Bandolier, Corn & Sickle, 1927, courtesy Throckmorton Fine Art
 
Although a number of her most famous images (a bouquet of overblown roses, a single calla lily, a puppeteer's hands) are here in posthumous platinum prints, many of the less familiar pictures are vintage and quite rare.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Ellen von Unwerth at Staley-Wise

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, January 19, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

DATE: January 19, 2010

Many of von Unwerth's photographs, fashion and otherwise, take place in a casually eroticized world without men, a place where girls just wanna have fun wearing nothing but expensive lingerie.

 

In this show of color and black-and-white work, men appear only as props or toys for women who show a much greater interest in one another—kissing, cuddling, dancing in the nude. Helmut Newton is the obvious precedent here, but von Unwerth's pictures are far more sensuous; she softens Newton's hard edge with a lively sense of fun and a voluptuousness that recalls Lillian Bassman

From the New Yorker

 

Ellen von Unwerth, Fraulein, Courtesy Staley-Wise Gallery, New York

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