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Review: Andrew Bush at Yossi Milo

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 15, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Bush's big color photographs of people driving their cars are spread between two galleries (held in conjunction with Julie Saul Gallery), providing ample opportunities for the kind of voyeurism and snap judgments that are usually indulged on the road.


Nearly all the pictures were taken in and around Los Angeles, where Bush lives, and are straightforward but surprisingly elegant. California's cult of the car is only part of the story here; the vehicles start to look like sleek or clunky mobile sculptures, but their occupants are far more interesting. Most are unaware of the camera in the next car, cocooned in their air-conditioned living rooms on wheels.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Review: Mary Mattingly at Robert Mann

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 8, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Mattingly's color photographs are sci-fi fantasies of a future in which nomadic figures in tentlike robes or protective jumpsuits wander through a brave new depopulated world.


In several pictures, these faceless figures (survivors? explorers? lone visionaries?) look out over untouched vistas—a snowy mountain range, a receding glacier, a choppy sea. But there's something elegiac about the landscapes, as if they're all that's left of an environment and a civilization that have been reduced to the contents of the towering cardboard boxes that some of the nomads (and a life-size sculpture in the gallery) trundle around on their bicycles.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Review: Mary Mattingly at Robert Mann

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 8, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Mattingly's color photographs are sci-fi fantasies of a future in which nomadic figures in tentlike robes or protective jumpsuits wander through a brave new depopulated world.


In several pictures, these faceless figures (survivors? explorers? lone visionaries?) look out over untouched vistas—a snowy mountain range, a receding glacier, a choppy sea. But there's something elegiac about the landscapes, as if they're all that's left of an environment and a civilization that have been reduced to the contents of the towering cardboard boxes that some of the nomads (and a life-size sculpture in the gallery) trundle around on their bicycles.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Review: Edward Steichen and Martin Munkácsi at Howard Greenberg

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 8, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

32 vintage prints by Edward Steichen document his mastery of the sharp focus and straightforward composition that characterized the new photography of the post-World War I era.


Hungarian-born Martin Munkácsi was one of the best-known interwar photographers. Compared to Steichen's somewhat bloodless images, Munkácsi's "Liberia, 1931," "The Puddle Jumper, 1934," and "Harlemites doing the Lindy Hop at the Savoy Ballroom, 1936," among the 17 vintage prints in this show, brim with energy and warmth.

Read the complete review in The Wall Street Journal.

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Review: Paul Himmel at Keith de Lellis Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 8, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Originally conceived as a 95th birthday celebration, this show became a memorial tribute when the photographer died shortly before the opening.


However, Himmel, who took his last photograph in 1967, was involved in preparing the show, itself another indication of the belated recognition of his work that began in 1999 with the publication of "Photographs."

The largest of the black and white pictures is "Brooklyn Bridge, c. 1950," 60-by-48 inches, an image of a solitary man in an overcoat and fedora leaning on the iron railing of the bridge's pedestrian walkway, looking out at the humbling skyline of the city.

Read the complete review in The Wall Street Journal.

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