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Review: Emmet Gowin at Pace/MacGill

Posted By Administration, Saturday, March 14, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

The reissue of Gowin's first book of photographs prompts this exhibition of images from that 1976 monograph.


The prime subject of these small black-and-white prints is Gowin's immediate family and their rural Virginia home, but they're hardly conventional pictures of the wife and kids. Edith Gowin, one of photography's great muses, looks like a Dorothea Lange sharecropper, so her frequent, entirely matter-of-fact nudity is startling. With Edith as a collaborator, Gowin probed family intimacy and its undertow of eroticism as well as the quotidian wonders of country life, inspiring Sally Mann, Andrea Modica, and a host of others.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: Gail Albert Halaban at Robert Mann

Posted By Administration, Friday, March 13, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Like so many New Yorkers, Halaban can't help staring into her neighbors' windows, but she's made an art of it. Most of her big color photographs are views across streets, alleyways, or airshafts into apartments.


A man plays with his dog; a young couple cuddle with their baby; the solitary stand in Hopperesque isolation. The fact that Halaban has staged these moments doesn't make them any less resonant of the contradictory impulses of metropolitan life: the desire to connect and the need to be left alone. Voyeurs will be frustrated by Halaban's polite scenarios, but she's playing the good neighbor.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: Fraenkel Gallery's Anniversary Show on Edward Hopper and Photography

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 5, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Images Separated at Birth? Little attention has been paid to American photography's relationship to Hopper.


So for the 30th anniversary of the Fraenkel Gallery, the San Francisco photography dealer Jeffrey Fraenkel has assembled an ambitious show and an accompanying book to explore this terrain.

Read the complete review in the New York Times.The exhibition, "Edward Hopper & Company," which opens on Thursday and runs through May 2, groups seven paintings and three sketches by Hopper with dozens of images by eight photographers, most of whom are represented by the gallery: Robert Adams, Diane Arbus, Harry Callahan, William Eggleston, Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander and Stephen Shore.

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Review: Mark Ruwedel at Yossi Milo

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 5, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Ruwedel's modestly scaled black-and-white photographs of landscapes in the American and Canadian West combine the descriptive rigor of classic nineteenth-century survey shots with the more skeptical viewpoint of the nineteen-seventies' New Topographics crew.


His results, installed in thematic, twelve-shot grids around the gallery, are as handsome as they are shrewd. Ruwedel documents the now abandoned sites of pioneering railways—trestles, tunnels, cuts, grades—many of which are being reclaimed by the wild. The most dramatic of his photographs depict the paths carved between mountains, reminders of the determined push west and the landscape's gradual push back.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: "Sacred Sight, Photographs in India" at Howard Greenberg

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 4, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

India has provided visiting photographers with a fascinating if elusive subject: exotic and tantalizingly unknowable.


A serious survey exhibition on India as seen through the camera's lens (one that includes more than token Indian artists) remains to be done, but this show, drawn largely from the gallery's rich archives, is a useful jumping-off point. Among the sharpest foreign observers here are Henri Cartier-Bresson, William Gedney, Marc Riboud, and Margaret Bourke-White. Four of Mary Ellen Mark's color images of brothel life along Bombay's Falkland Road are a high point, as are the vividly hand-colored vintage studio portraits that open the show.

From The New Yorker.

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