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AIPAD News Archive (2009)
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Review: Shinichi Maruyama at Bruce Silverstein

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 17, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Maruyama, a Japanese photographer now based in New York, creates sensational abstract images of what is essentially Action painting in midair, frozen with the aid of advanced strobe-light technology.


His only materials are black ink and water, almost always seen in collision against stark white backgrounds. The results are calligraphic, erotic, and elegant, not unlike James Nares's big, liquid brushstroke paintings, but with echoes of Harold Edgerton and Adam Fuss as well. Maruyama shares the gallery with Aaron Siskind, and, like him, brings spontaneity and control into perfect balance.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: Stephen Shames at Steven Kasher Gallery

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 17, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Shames, whose photographs of Black Panthers were shown here in 2007, makes another strong impact with pictures collected under the title "Childhood & Youth."


The eighty-seven black-and-white photographs, taken between 1968 and 2005, are as tough and unapologetic as their subjects—young activists, and kids smoking pot, shooting dope, and sniffing glue. His shots of teen hustlers in Times Square were made in the early eighties, when Larry Clark stalked the same sidewalks. Both photographers are drawn to rebels and outlaws, not as voyeurs but as witnesses with outsider streaks of their own.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: Vince Aletti reviews light/dark at Sepia International

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 17, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

In this sensitively curated group show, the most basic elements of black-and-white photography are also the subtlest. The approaches and the materials are radically different, but nearly all the works edge into abstraction.


Among the standouts are Go Sugimoto's white-on-white images of curled or floating paper, as evanescent as breath on glass. Michelle Kloehn's tintypes are more substantial, but their subjects are mysterious—equal parts science and magic. Working with antique glass-plate negatives of astronomical phenomena (eclipses, exploding galaxies, shooting stars), Linda Connor conjures deep space as an astonishing dreamscape of diamond dust and rings of fire.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: Aaron Siskind at Bruce Silverstein

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, February 4, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

This master of photographic abstraction always grounded his work in the real world—in peeling plaster, broken windows, paint-slathered walls, and tar on concrete.


When Siskind's sources aren't immediately recognizable, their gritty physicality gives them a nice visual traction, and when his subject is evident it's thrilling to watch it dissolve into nothing but form and texture. The hundred and one photographs in this museum-quality exhibition are organized by series to show Siskind working through variations on a theme: grasses as brushstrokes, seaweed as calligraphy, a distressed wall as an expressionist canvas. His inventiveness is casual, instinctive, and irresistible.

From The New Yorker.

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Review: "Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Celebration" at Laurence Miller Gallery

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 3, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

One of the city's longest-running photography galleries salutes itself.


Two of the gallery's prime attractions, Helen Levitt and Ray K. Metzker, open the show with a pair of quiet knockouts that slip between representation and abstraction. They have strong support from Michael Spano, Stephane Couturier, Val Telberg, and other reliable Miller mainstays, but what keeps the show popping is a few surprises from the inventory, including a Polaroid of the shape-shifter Yasumasa Morimura as Greta Garbo, Bruce Wrighton's unexpectedly lovely color shot of a public bathroom, and Yasuhiro Ishimoto's heady evocation of the Playboy Club circa 1950.

From The New Yorker.

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