Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In
Search
AIPAD News Archive (2009)
Blog Home All Blogs
Search all posts for:   

 

Bruce Davidson at Bryce Wolkowitz and Howard Greenberg

Posted By Administration, Monday, December 7, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

The photographer Bruce Davidson is having a well-deserved moment. At the age of seventy-six, he has two exhibitions running concurrently, and a new, three-volume survey of his fifty-year career.


The range, dedication, and audacity of that career are the focus of the show at Wolkowitz, where contemporary prints, some quite large, sketch a loose trajectory from the circus (1958) to the subway (the early eighties). He also spent two years in the late sixties photographing the residents on a notorious block of East 100th Street, the subject of his show at Greenberg.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Robert Frank at Pace MacGill

Posted By Administration, Thursday, November 19, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

A group of contact sheets has been reconfigured by the artist so that each row contains one image from "The Americans." It's the core of this show and a complement to the Met's current exhibition on Frank's groundbreaking book.


A ten-picture sequence, shot from New York bus windows in 1958, provides another example of Frank's unerring eye for the passing scene. But the other work here gives viewers an idea of how radically his approach has changed in the years since.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

John Wood, Yao Lu, and Aaron Siskind at Bruce Silverstein Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, November 19, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

A strong group of Wood's photo-collages, made between 1955 and 2006, are the centerpiece here. Yao, a Chinese photographer making his U.S. début, adds the flash with a shrewd series of large color images inspired by classic Chinese landscape paintings.


What appear to be mountains are, in fact, piles of garbage draped with construction netting and dotted with tiny pagodas, waterfalls, and industrial plants. The digital imagery is seamless; the message about the environment is pointed. But in the back room, a group of vintage Siskind photographs of found Abstract Expressionist images blows everything else—in the gallery, and in Chelsea—away.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Lillian Bassman at Staley-Wise

Posted By Administration, Thursday, November 19, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

At ninety-two, this great American fashion photographer is making the biggest and most challenging work of her career.


Whether the extravagant scale of some of the pictures in her new show is suited to images characterized by a hushed, dreamy intimacy is debatable. But as Bassman continues to reinterpret pictures made as far back as 1950, the best of these photographs convey all the energy and excitement she put into them. Many of the largest images are head shots of dark-eyed women—haughty goddesses whose ethereal glamour is exaggerated by prints that dissolve detail into powdery passages.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

25th Anniversary Exhibition at Hans P Kraus Jr

Posted By Administration, Saturday, November 14, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

The gallery celebrates twenty-five years in business with a remarkable group of mostly nineteenth-century photographs.


Among images by Steichen, Stieglitz, Cameron, and Käsebier are several from photography's earliest years, including a daguerreotype by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey of an Egyptian woman who emerges from a silvery mist like an apparition, and a delicate, foggy fragment by William Henry Fox Talbot, which is shown only on request. Landscapes and architectural views predominate, and none is more arresting than Humphry Lloyd Hime's picture of a Canadian prairie that's as modern and minimal as a Sugimoto seascape.

From the New Yorker.

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 2 of 16
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  >   >>   >| 
Thank you for taking the time to participate in the survey below.

Membership Management Software  ::  Legal