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AIPAD News Archive (2009)
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Neil Winokur at Janet Borden

Posted By Administration, Saturday, November 14, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Winokur's portraits of artists and friends, made in the eighties, look even better in retrospect. Forty of the garishly colored photographs are here, many on view for the first time.


Among the throng are Cindy Sherman, Laurie Simmons, Philip Glass, Mary Boone, and Andy Warhol, most of whom pose before neon-bright backdrops, facing forward, passport-picture style. The results are far from flattering but irresistible even when the subject isn't famous. Like Thomas Ruff's eighties portraits (most of which Winokur's predate), they have a matter-of-fact documentary quality that avoids any pretense of psychological depth while allowing us to absorb every ravishing detail.

From the New Yorker.

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Marcello Geppetti and Weegee at Keith de Lellis Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 29, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

This exhibition of celebrity portraits from the golden age of the candid camera—from Marilyn Monroe to Brigitte Bardot—is primarily a showcase for one of Italy's first and most audacious paparazzi.


Weegee holds his own with pictures that, no matter how spontaneous, never looked tossed off. His shots are witty, opinionated, and occasionally rude. Perhaps because his angle is gossip rather than news, Geppetti's work is looser and lighter, with a nice comic zing. His pictures of Bardot out shopping, Nureyev dancing with Talitha Getty, and Jackie and Aristotle Onassis in the back of a limo are the models for every tabloid stalker shot since.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Alfred Gescheidt at Higher Pictures

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 29, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Gescheidt's photographs, made between 1949 and 1979, are brash, crass, and bound to offend contemporary sensibilities.


He worked in black-and-white and with a wide variety of pre-Photoshop collage and montage techniques to make memorably provocative pictures: a young preppy couple with babies' heads, the Washington Monument as a stake for giant horseshoes, "American Gothic" restaged with Shirley Chisholm and George Wallace. If many of these images are tasteless period pieces, others (like a series on the difficulties of stopping smoking) remain pointed and alarmingly funny.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Keizo Kitajima at Amador Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 29, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

The portraits in this Japanese photographer's exhibition were made between 1975 and 1991, primarily on the street but also in places ranging from dive bars off the U.S. Army base on Okinawa to New York's Danceteria.


His best work is the earliest, which is dark and a bit disturbing, including shots of off-duty soldiers, working girls, and Tokyo drag queens. Some of these images were rephotographed for maximum grain and distortion, but even without this manipulation much of the later work has a similarly edgy, ominous mood reminiscent of Brassaï, Leon Levinstein, and Kitajima's teacher, Daido Moriyama.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Hiroshi Sugimoto at Fraenkel Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 29, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Kenneth Baker of theSan Francisco Chroniclereviews an exhibition of Hiroshi Sugimoto's "Lightning Fields" at Fraenkel Gallery.


I consider photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto an extraordinary artist. His 2007 retrospective at the de Young Museum proved as much. But I am not that keen on Sugimoto's "Lightning Fields," the sampling of his new work at Fraenkel.

Consider his title. Sugimoto is surely aware that some people will suspect him of trying to steal thunder from Walter De Maria, whose land art masterpiece "The Lightning Field" (1977) ought to have earned him exclusive use of that phrase. Yet "Lightning Fields" makes conceptual sense as a title for Sugimoto's pictures.

Read the complete review in The San Francisco Chronicle.

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