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Nicholas Nixon at Pace MacGill

Posted By Administration, Saturday, September 26, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Nixon used a 1946 view camera to make the black-and-white prints in his latest show, which is divided between two very different but oddly complementary bodies of work, both from the past two years.


Views of downtown Boston, taken from elevated vantage points, emphasize often jarring juxtapositions between old and new. Alongside these studies in urban density are self-portraits made at such close range that Nixon's face becomes a landscape—his beard wild underbrush, his gaping mouth a tar pit—pierced by enormous, all-seeing eyes.

From The New Yorker.

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Brassaï at Edwynn Houk

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 25, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Brassaï's photographs of Paris in the thirties, nearly all of which were taken after dark, have come to define the seamy, seductive glamour of that city's night life.


In these marvellous black-and-white images, cafés, night clubs, brothels, and public sidewalks become stage sets for charged, frequently erotic encounters. Among the nearly forty vintage prints gathered here are some of Brassaï's most vivacious pictures, including several little-known shots of couples at dance halls. There are also a few surprises, including three closeups of melted soap and a twist of raw cotton that slip between Surrealism, science fiction, and pornography.

From The New Yorker.

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Allen Frame at Gitterman Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 25, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Frame's big, handsome color photographs of friends and lovers are not unlike the black-and-white images he's shown previously; they're subtle, intimate, and often quite dark, with a painterly feel for the chiaroscuro effects of shadow and light.


But color, nearly always burnished by the sun, adds warmth to the work and draws us deeper into the circumscribed spaces he uses to frame his subjects. Most of them are alone in a dimly lit room, sometimes no more than silhouettes before a window, and even when they're outdoors they appear delineated by landscape or architecture, in a style that recalls David Hockney.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Jed Fielding at Andrea Meislin Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 25, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Fielding's photographs of the blind children he met at schools in Mexico City are not in the tradition of photojournalistic muckraking. Like his terrific earlier series from the streets of Naples, these images are vivacious, audacious, and in your face.


His subjects are not pitiable victims; they're rambunctious, apparently happy kids at play, responding to Fielding's attention with curiosity and delight. The best of the work was made at close range, where that connection was most tangible, and young faces fill the frames with fragile, vivid life.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Todd Hido at Bruce Silverstein Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 25, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Hido's American landscapes—fallow fields, empty roads, a few bare trees—are seen in passing through dirty windshields, so his photographs appear smudged and indistinct.


The effect is self-consciously painterly, recalling nineteenth-century pictorialism, but it's nearly drained of romance, and the vistas are resolutely ordinary. Wintry light and wet weather combine for an underwater feeling, as if we were peering through a fish tank at a place that rarely sees sun. In the front space, Nicolai Howalt's "Car Crash Studies" have echoes of Weegee and John Chamberlain, but some of the material is so raw it resists aesthetic transformation.

From The New Yorker.

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