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Review: Jacques Henri Lartigue at Howard Greenberg

Posted By Administration, Saturday, September 19, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Lartigue's earliest photographs were made at the turn of the last century, when he was a child, and if the excitement, spontaneity, playfulness, and wonder of those pictures were difficult to sustain in his later years, they never entirely disappeared.


This exhibition of vintage and early prints might well be the most charming and exhilarating show in town. Included are some of Lartigue's most famous images, along with many more never shown before, nearly all of people in motion: diving, jumping, skating, or simply strolling in the park; in flimsy biplanes, flimsier go-carts, and huge automobiles.

From in The New Yorker.

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Review: Simen Johan at Yossi Milo

Posted By Administration, Saturday, September 19, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Johan works the fertile ground between reality and illusion in big color photographs of animals and one spooky, fogbound weeping willow.


At nearly six feet by eight feet, the largest of these pictures rival natural-history dioramas, but very little is natural about this menagerie. A deer in a snowy forest is uncannily white; malevolent snakes curl around sticks and one another in a sunny ravine, like fugitives from Dante's Inferno. Johan undermines even his most convincing fictions, and the nagging sense that something is wrong here keeps viewers just where he wants us: on edge.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Review: Hellen van Meene at Yancey Richardson

Posted By Administration, Saturday, September 19, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

The Dutch photographer shows portraits of girls and some boys made over the past two years in Russia, the Netherlands, New York, and on a trip through the American South.


Like her previous work with children and adolescents, these new pictures are intriguing blends of naturalism and artifice. Encouraged to express themselves, van Meene's kids can be touchingly self-conscious or self-possessed, but they're all wonderfully complicated works in progress.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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National Geographic Society Photographs at Steven Kasher Gallery

Posted By Administration, Sunday, August 30, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

For many years there has been a kind of secret museum of photography under the streets of northwest Washington — an immense, windowless, climate-controlled archive with roots reaching back more than a century.


The pictures make up the archive of the National Geographic Society. "People don't realize how beautiful this collection is," said William C. Bonner, the society's archivist, "and it's a shame, in a way, that I'm the only one who's seen many of these pictures." It was this sentiment that motivated him and officials there to explore the idea of opening up the holdings to the fine-art market for the first time.

After considering proposals from several dealers, the society recently chose the Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea, which has worked with several other large archives of photojournalistic images. On Sept. 17 the gallery will open its first exhibition of National Geographic pictures — 150 vintage prints from a dozen photographers.

All images are from the National Geographic Image Collection and will be part of a limited series of photographs and illustrations for purchase through the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York.

Read the complete article in The New York Times.

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Glitz & Grime: Photographs of Times Square at Yancey Richardson

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Yet another broad take on New York City, this one zeroing in on a crossroads that photographers helped make famous. The five pictures on the opening wall range from 1947 to 1997, from Rudy Burckhardt to Philip-Lorca diCorcia, and are as choreographed as a modern dance, with silhouetted figures converging and separating.


Olivo Barbieri's aerial view and Andrew Moore's shot of a sign-encrusted corner of Forty-second Street, both in super-saturated color, capture the site's current unreality.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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