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Review: Eugene Richards at Fahey/Klein Gallery

Posted By Administration, Thursday, July 2, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Photographer Eugene Richards has chronicled poverty, drug addiction, aging and death. He's documented emergency room medicine, his first wife's struggle with cancer and the toll of river blindness and pediatric AIDS.


The former member of the Magnum photo agency has received just about every award given to photojournalists, published numerous books, and produced several short films.

There's an urgency to the style and subject matter of his work, which makes his recent photographs of abandoned structures in the West and Midwest seem, at first, a dramatic departure. The series is also his first body of work in color.

Read the complete review in The Los Angeles Times.

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Review: Kenneth Josephson at Robert Koch Gallery

Posted By Administration, Saturday, June 20, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Everyone interested in 20th century photography has seen the one or two pictures by Kenneth Josephson that always make it into anthologies, and probably no more. So the Koch Gallery performs a great service in presenting a substantial show of his work.


Josephson studied with Minor White and was closely associated with Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. Posthumously, they have each eclipsed Josephson in reputation, but even some of his early work maintains a currency that theirs lacks. So called "conceptual photography," of which Josephson counts as a founding figure, is a going thing today.

Read the complete review in The San Francisco Chronicle.

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Review: Don Schol at PDNB Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, June 19, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Don Schol is a Vietnam veteran and no stranger to the horror of war. But from the moment he arrived in 1967, his experience was destined to be different.


Schol was appointed the head of a team of combat artists who from October 1967 to April 1968 crisscrossed Vietnam to paint, sculpt, shoot pictures and, like every other soldier, try to survive – which posed the biggest challenge.

An exhibition of Schol's work is on view through Saturday at Photographs Do Not Bend on Dragon Street in the Dallas Design District. It consists of 16 wood-cut prints that Schol hopes will "grab people, make them think about what they're seeing. I want them to realize ... this could be any war

Read the complete review in the Dallas Morning News.

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Review: Debbie Fleming Caffery at Gitterman Gallery

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, June 9, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Caffery's black-and-white photographs have always had an otherworldly cast—a sense that she's looking beyond the physical to something more ethereal.


"The Spirit & the Flesh," the title of her new book of pictures from Mexico, though applicable to all her work, is especially appropriate for this exhibition of pictures from the book, many of them taken in brothels. Caffery's prostitutes—earthy, voluptuous, naked—are sometimes masked, sometimes in shadow, but, no matter how gloomy the setting, they appear burnished, luminous. There are echoes here of Brassaï, Bellocq, and Bravo.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Review: Lili Almog at Andrea Meislin Gallery

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, June 9, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Almog's photographs of Chinese women, many of them members of the Muslim minority living in rural provinces, are at once affectionate and anthropological—occasionally radiant, unfailingly sincere, but rather stiff and a little dry.


A series of brief video portraits livens things up, as do unexpected splashes of color: vibrant red, blue, and green fabrics against a bleached-out landscape. And Almog's subjects themselves are ingratiating, if only because they're so rarely photographed. They may not be entirely comfortable in front of the camera, but they face it with a charming lack of guile, an openness that Almog never exploits.

From The New Yorker.

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