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Review: Hiroh Kikai at Yancey Richardson

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, June 9, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Fourteen black-and-white photographs taken in one Tokyo neighborhood between 1974 and 2003 provide a core sample of a portrait project that Kikai continues to pursue after some thirty years on the street.


His subjects, most of whom stand before a featureless temple wall, are wonderfully random: a young girl in traditional dress, a boy in a crude homemade wrestler's mask, a maintenance man in a biker's helmet, a bunny in a cape.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Review: Helen Levitt at Laurence Miller

Posted By Administration, Thursday, May 28, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

The great New York street photographer, who died in March, at the age of ninety-five, left behind an extraordinary and endlessly engaging body of work, the best known examples of which were made in the nineteen-forties.


Children were Levitt's most famous subjects, and her vivacious pictures of urchins at play spark this memorial show. But she was just as alert to the presence of crones and codgers on tenement stoops and—in a rarely exhibited series taken with Walker Evans's camera—riders on the subway.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Vince Aletti reviews Leonard Freed Exhibit at Silverstein Gallery

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, May 27, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Leonard Freed was one of the six photographers first identified as "concerned" by Cornell Capa. Like André Kertész, Werner Bischof, and Capa's brother Robert, Freed was an artist with a deeply humanist bent—an engaged photojournalist, never a dispassionate observer.


The best evidence of his concern may be his 1968 book, "Black in White America," the subject of a timely exhibition at the Silverstein gallery. Freed travelled throughout the segregated South, but only occasionally worked the front lines of the civil-rights struggle. He was more interested in the lives of the ordinary black Americans.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Review: Ray Mortenson at Janet Borden

Posted By Administration, Saturday, May 16, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

Mortenson's small black-and-white photographs of Manhattan have so many precedents that they already look comfortably familiar.


Berenice Abbott's pictures of the city in the nineteen-thirties provide a key template for his images of skyscrapers sweeping upward. Even if the buildings here are virtually featureless International Style monoliths, the work has a classic sense of restraint and a traditionalist's eye for elegant composition. But there's nothing retro to Mortenson's cityscapes (nearly all from 2008); they're muscular and crisp and smartly varied.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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Review: Jeff Bark at Charles Cowles Gallery

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 15, 2009
Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014

For his first New York exhibition, "Flesh Rainbow," Bark shows large-scale photographs of male nudes, female nudes, and still-lifes, in triptychs that include one of each.


But don't expect a polite, academic exercise. Bark's figures are bizarre—outrageous and fetishistic, sometimes more comic than erotic, often both at once. One ample woman is veiled to the waist in tendrils of her own dark hair; a lithe young man has had a large bowl of spaghetti overturned on his head; another one wears a black bucket. Bark's models might be creatures of artifice, but they're also far more naked than nude and unlike anything you've seen before.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.

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