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The Best of 2011

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, December 27, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Richard Dorment Looks Back on the Year


Chief Art Critic of The Telegraph, Richard Dorment highlights his favorites. While painting received much attention, and the grand exhibitions remain memorable, Dorment notes a shift in the museum world toward smaller intimate exhibitions that are powerful, memorable, and rewarding. While the continuing economic slow-down may be to blame for this shift towards in-house and smaller-scale exhibitions it could also be to thank for recontextualization and more profound and concentrated exhibitions and viewing.

As Dorment turned his focus from the "Old Masters" he credits for many of the year's highlights he mentioned photographer Thomas Struth and his monumental portrait of Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor as his "most admired" contemporary work of the year.

For more on this story, please visit The Telegraph

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Slashing the Budget- Republican Plan to End Federal Arts, Humanities, and Public Broadcasting

Posted By Administration, Thursday, December 22, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

The Republican Study Committee announces plans to eliminate nations leading arts grants.


Made of about 165 House members, the Republican Study Committee plans to end the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The NEA fought to stay alive in 1995 and suffered a cut of almost 40%, forcing nearly all individual artists grants to be eliminated. When inflation is considered, the NEA's purchasing power fell to almost $60 million less annually than the last culture battle in the 90's.

The art-choaking Spending Reduction Act of 2011 lays out reductions of federal spending by $2.5 trillion over 10 years; current culture spending is a measly $1.6 billion a year. Cultural "giants" in Washington not to be cut include Smithsonian Institution ($761.4 million), Institute of Museum and Library Services ($282.3 million), National Gallery of Art ($167 million) and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (about $20 million).

We can hope that if investment in cultural enrichment is not a factor in the minds of the GOP that perhaps the 5.7 million jobs and annual tax returns of $30 billion to all levels of government will be considered.

For more on this story visit the LA Times.




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Google Goggles & the Met

Posted By Administration, Thursday, December 22, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

New technology allows for greater access to Met's collection


The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced new alliance with Google to bring information on their collection to viewer's fingertips. Museum goers and international remote search now able to provide information on over 76,000 works in their collection and plans to expand. Avoiding difficult works, including sculptures and objects, as well as copyrighted material, smartphone owners can take an image of the artwork and access information related to the image search. Remote users can use posters, cards, etc. to access Museum collection and related information.

More on this story at artdaily.org

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Royalties to Artists

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 21, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Proposed 7% Royalty Payment in Droit de Suite Bill Introduced to Congress


Last week the US Congress proposed legislation that would give a portion of resales back to artists and museums. As with the music and film industry the concept of royalty payments would apply. Works sold at major auction houses that exceeded $10,000 would be subject to a 7% royalty split between artists and museums. The proposal is part of the 2011 Equity for Visual Artists Act and was proposed by New York Democrat Jerrold Nadler in the House and Wisconsin Democrat Herb Kohl in the Senate. As the law stands the proposal would exclude online and private gallery resales.

For more on this story please visit The Art Newspaper

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The Getty's Man Ray Archive Expands

Posted By Administration, Saturday, December 17, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

New Acquisitions Broaden the Getty Research Institue's Collection


The already substantial Getty collection of Man Ray's work was expanded this week with two acquisitions. Already in posession of over 300 photographs, rayographs, and solarized prints the Getty now owns a wealth of manuscripts, correspondance and publications, photographs, additional artworks, and personal notes of the artist. The first acquisition was gained through purchase from the Twentieth-Century Art Arhives in Cambridge, England and had been owned by Michael and Elsa Combe-Martin. The couple had been friends of the artist and his wife and an intimate view into the persona of Ray will certainly be gathered through study of correspondance. Additional light to be shed on Ray's thoughts and reactions through the second acquisition. Acquired through a private collector were photographs by Gianfranco Baruchello, an Italian photographer, of Duchamp with his legendary work The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even; eight prints of Duchamp fill a portfolio and are accompanied by a diary of Man Ray with reflections on his contemporary, Duchamp, and the art world.

More information on this story in Art in America

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