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MoMA Raises Ticket Price

Posted By Administration, Thursday, August 4, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

To stay on balance


Acting in line with the Metropolitan Museum who also recently increased ticket price to $25 for adults, MoMA matched the entry fee. The privately funded museum gathers much of its revenue the hard way- getting people through the door. While some may be put off by the increase, and some backlash has occurred in regards to the Director's high paid salary, this is one institution for which quality is expected and paid for. With operating costs on the rise, these changes are to be expected.

For more on this story visit Culture WNYC

Additional coverage Bloomberg.com

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Big Impact: Reflecting on the Scale of Contemporary Works

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, July 27, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Intimate or Grandiose, Size is Important


The scale of work has continued to trend on the large side even accounting for the 2008 economic "dip" when works did shrink with sales. We are again facing oversized artworks.

We have a tendency to think this is a new concept, but through time private and public collectors have used art as means to display power and wealth. One would hope the concern for collecting were more than status symbol, but we must not forget patrons of the Renaissance or commissions for religious entities. The past is perhaps the best guide for the future and while some of the reasons around collection have changed the desire for impact remains. Todays palaces have been replaced by Contemporary museums, and weather public or private the desire to impose visual impact on guests is the idea. New museums wish to fill their cavernous galleries, but what will the backlash of this be? Weather private or public grand is great, but a desire for development should also be taken into account.

For more on this story visit The Art Newspaper

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Extra Large View

Posted By Administration, Monday, July 18, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Photographer John Chiara Uses 18th Century Technology To Get It All In


When Bay Area photographer John Chiara takes an image the process is part and parcel of the shot. What a process it is- Chiara has taken interest in creating his own cameras- the low-tech but oversized cameras function like the old daguerreotype box cameras. A positive, not a negative, is made and the unique prints come directly out of the monster machine. Requiring processing in drums the size of cement mixers the camera itself rides on a flat bed trailer to each shoot.

The time to make each image is extended but the quality of the prints unmatched. Though a bit bulky, sometimes the roots of a process do yield the best results.

For more on the artist, his process, and related exhibitions please visit the San Francisco Chronicle.

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In the Mix: Melting-Pot Museum

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, July 13, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Congressman James P. Moran Backs the Concept


While museums dedicated to the wide variety of American nationalities continues to appear on the American landscape and in particular on the Washington Mall, it is perhaps time to consider our commonality as Americans?

A true melting pot, America is home to a rainbow of nationalities, ethnicities, colors, and creeds. Why then, wondered federal employee Sam Eskenazi, and mastermind behind the concept, is there not a museum dedicated to the people of America? From art and history to storytelling, should we consider the power of wholeness as greater than division? Democratic Congressman James P. Moran supports the idea of such a venue.

For more on this story visit the New York Times

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Poignant Donation by Richard Misrach

Posted By Administration, Monday, July 11, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013
Image

33 prints of the devastating 1991 firestorm were donated to the Oakland Museum of California and the Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive


The internationally acclaimed Bay Area photographer, Richard Misrach, made a generous donation to museums in the affected community of East Bay which was ravaged by a firestorm 20 years ago. Donation is a great honor and welcome, but bittersweet reminder of a horrific event.

The 1991 firestorm killed 25, injured 150, and devastated thousands of houses and over 1,500 acres of land. Immediately following the fire, Richard Misrach, known for monumental images and capturing man's imprint on nature, set out to record the fire's path and print. Never before seen images have been gifted to the communities affected. Images filled with remembrance shall also serve to celebrate rejuvenation in time past.

Both institutions to hold exhibitions this fall which will showcase the gift of the artist and engage the collective memory of the community. Installations relating to the fire to accompany the photographic work and opportunities for viewers to record their personal experience and recollection also available via over-sized text constructed by the artist.

For more on the donation please visit artdaily

For information on the Exhibition and related events:
Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

Oakland Museum of California


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