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New Director for Victoria and Albert Museum

Posted By Administration, Monday, April 25, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Martin Roth to replace Mark Jones as Director


Martin Roth will step up to fill the position of Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum and replace Mark Jones, who has been acting director since 2001. Jones is going onto take the position of Master of St. Cross College at Oxford University. Roth is leaving the Dresden State Art Collection in Germany where he was General Director to lead the self proclaimed world leader in art and design.

Roth is welcomed into an institution with big plans for future development. Just one month ago the museum announced the winning architect, Amanda Levete, for the planned $56 million expansion that will increase exhibition space and add a courtyard.

The new director is highly qualified with much experience managing, maintaining, and growing refined arts institutions. While at Dresden Roth was known for renovations and reconstructions and will surely take the Victoria and Albert Museum into the future with great strides.

Full Article at the New York Times

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Behind the Curve: L.A. Museums

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, April 20, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Numbers Speek Poorly For an International Art Scene of Prominence


Though Los Angeles has continued to grow as a major player in the international art scene its anual museum attendance pales in comparison to smaller US venues. The results of the the the anual Art Newspaper's survey of the highest attended museums were disappointing for southern Californians, as only the Getty Center and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art ranked within the top 100 US museums in annual attendance. Other significant southern California venues didn't even make the list. The Getty came in 33rd behind New York giants but also San Francisco's De Young Museum and the Art Institute of Chicago; the L.A. County Museum ranked 53 behind the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston.

No doubt the Getty is a true destination, and in fairness its success could be clouded by urban sprawl, lack of major headlining exhibitions in the past year, or the the out of town "swing vote." For many high-ranking museums on the survey the tourist accounts for half the attendance or more.

We must wonder if it is the artists, the established and emerging galleries in Southern California who are the true leading force behind the L.A. scene. Do the true art consumers flock not to the mecca but to the local establishments? For as big as the area, as large as the city, and as progressive the pace, perhaps the L.A. scene is best anchored by its roots. In the same line of thought we must continue- is this seeming disappointment the silver lining; is Southern California on the verge of something big?

For more on this story visit the Los Angeles Times

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Is Collapse of Arts Education Culprit for Arts Attendance Decline?

Posted By Administration, Saturday, March 12, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

New studies show decline in arts attendance in young generations, but who or what is to blame remains a debate.


Early 1970's "back to basics" movements in education mark a change in generations attendance of art events and drops continue. The downward spike in arts attendance- from visual and performing to music arts is greater for black and latino populations than for caucasian populations. This fact has added to the argument that arts funding and education in schools, slimmer in minority areas, is a crucial factor in cultivating arts interest young generations. Another argument is simple number comparison to previous generations- there are fewer youths today than the high-water mark of the baby-boom generation. Additional research, and most alarming, is the lack of the well rounded consuming cultural consumer the report calls the "omnivore," who accounts for nearly 60% of arts attendance across the board. The "omnivore" population percentage has declined. Weather due to age or decline of arts education the trend will have to be corrected to keep cultural institutions in business.

Full coverage in the LA Times.




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Shut: Blind Photographer's Story

Posted By Administration, Friday, March 11, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Pete Eckert works with sound, memory, and touch to generate visual imagery for the rest of us.


Using all his senses but site to construct and compose his images Pete Eckert has been creating photographs for nearly 20 years. Eckert's dream was to become an architect and after training in sculpture and industrial design he hoped to study architecture at Yale. Dreams seemed dashed by a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa, a condition that ends in permanent blindness, but the artis in him persisted.

Outfitted with specialized equipment and a tactile and acoustic awareness Eckert funnels sensory input into his mind's eye and the shot is taken. Eckert makes his works from framing the shot to developing negatives and prints independently. With a little help from his sighted friends, he can translate the seen and choose to print works that best capture his memory of the space or moment.

Eckert's work is haunting and felt. It is convincing from the inside. His new work with deaf-blind friends should prove to be a further step into darkness and into light. Frames translate not a lack of sensation, rather a heightened awareness on another plane.

Mutual Art's interview with the artist.

Artist's site.

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Trimming the Fat: Arts & Culture on the Block

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 3, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Museum professionals gather at nation's capitol to make the case for their importance.


Budgets are being trimmed and arts and cultural organizations are on the block. These already lean mean culture machines are fighting to keep what little they have and make the case for their contribution to society. Our 17,500 museums pump $20 billion into our economy and support jobs for half a million citizens, but beyond the monetary measure are the programs offered.

Danielle Rice, Executive Director of the Delaware Art Museum, who gathered with other colleagues on Capital Hill this Tuesday spoke out about Museum's role as cultural tourism destinations; public, private, and home-school resources; therapy providers for special needs children; and venues for local social organizations.

For more on this story visit Delaware Online.

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