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SFMOMA's Great Expansion

Posted By Administration, Sunday, February 20, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

195 promised gifts and plans for 2016 building expansion


Growth had originally been designed around the museum's 75th anniversary in 2010, but the ball got rolling and the bar raised.

The museum is well on its way to funding an expansion with $250 million committed to the $480 million total budget, and Norwegian firm Snøhetta is at work on the design. Last year announcement came that the new space will feature the Doris and Donald Fisher Collection- 1,100 works by highly noted mid to late 20'th century figures, including Alexander Calder, Cy Twombly, Agnes Martin, Andy Warhol, Richard Serra and Chuck Close. In all nine families are setting the standard for growth. The new announcement of 195 more acquisitions to include heavy hitters- Jackson Pollosck, Francis Bacon, Yves Klein, Bruce Nauman and artists who's work has been featured in retrospectives at SFMOMA, including Richard Tuttle, Jeff Koons, Anselm Kiefer, Diane Arbus, Brice Marden, Matthew Barney, Olafur Eliasson and Eva Hesse. On the whole these big moves mark more than an institution's anniversary, they set the stage for the SFOMA as a growing figure in the modern art landscape.

For more visit the San Francisco Chronicle.

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Egypt's Antiques Minister Announces Looting

Posted By Administration, Saturday, February 19, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Archeological sites suffered looting amidst antigovernment protest in Egypt.


While protesters rallied, looters plundered. Zahi Hawass, Antiques Minister of Egypt had assured priceless holdings were safe; new announcements by Hawass claim tombs in Saqqara and Abusir as well as storage facilities in Saqqara, the Cairo University among others were broken into. A committee to be formed to compile a list of missing objects.

Coverage in the New York Times.

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"The Day Nobody Died"

Posted By Administration, Saturday, February 19, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

War photographers Oliver Chanarin and Adam Broomberg turn documentary photography on its head.


Feeling the impact of war images have lost their real resonance Chanarin and Broomberg tried a new approach. Rather than capturing the horrors or heroism of war the pair carry a box of photographic paper to each scene and expose sheets to 20 seconds of light. The result is a haunting reduction of a simple action- opening and closing of a door; the light caught on paper shows no detection of violence or pain. If we have been desensitized to graphic imagery then perhaps the shier number of unseen records is chilling enough.

For more visit the LA Times.

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World Press Photo of the Year Goes to Jodi Bieber

Posted By Administration, Sunday, February 13, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

South African photographer wins 45th annual contest.


Bieber's winning image was a portrait of Bibi Aisha, an 18 year old from Afghanistan. The young woman's ears and nose were cut off as punishment after she escaped her husband's home. She fled to her parent's home complaining of abuse. The image sheds light on a personal story and exposes plainly a broader reality. The photograph is shocking but Bibi stares with dignity and beauty. She now lives in the US and is receiving counseling and reconstructive surgery.

World Press Photo.

Coverage in Le Monde

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On the Defensive: Museums Deaccessioning from the Permanent Collection

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 27, 2011
Updated: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Unnoticed taboo now raises controversy.


Major and minor art institutions to auction old-master paintings at Sothebys New York, and questions over the act of deaccessioning are again raised. Sails to refine or sharpen the scope of an institution's collection or to raise funds for a more appropriate artwork are allowed, but selling to cover operation costs is strictly forbidden.

While these sales may have gone under the radar in previous years, institutions like the Cleveland Museum of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Pennsylvania Museum of Fine Arts, Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago are preparing to or have recently sold works and are under the spotlight. In these lean times trimming the fat may be the only way to survive, and deaccessioning may sadly be a necessary evil.

For more on this story visit The New York Times.

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