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Music to Her Ears: Susan Philipsz Wins Turner Prize

Posted By Administration, Monday, December 6, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

This year's winner sculpted with sound, becoming the first Turner Prize recipient to make a work that could not be seen.


The announcement of this year's winner was controversial; some cries of protest were heard, but to many the work was embraced as beautiful and moving. Originally created and installed in open air under a series of three bridges for the Glasgow International art festival in May, the work was reconfigured for an interior space at the Tate. The sound is of the artist herself singing Lowlands Away, a traditional Scottish song.

The Guardian covers this story with video-feed interview, click here to view.

For visual documentation of the outdoor sound installation click here.

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Eadweard Muybridge Exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in DC

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, April 27, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

Technology moves fast, art slower. You could say that art is still catching up to Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904), a pioneer of stop-motion photography and early filmmaking.


In "Helios: Eadweard Muybridge in a Time of Change," at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, you can see how Muybridge himself got up to speed with industrialization, mechanization and the other radical changes of the late 19th century.

His impact on the 20th is difficult to overstate. The writer Rebecca Solnit, in her 2003 biography, called Muybridge "the man who split the second," aligning him with the inventor of the atom bomb.

Read the complete review in The New York Times.

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A Lost Film of Times Square by Louis Faurer Rediscovered

Posted By Administration, Saturday, April 24, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

On a recent Sunday afternoon, Mark Faurer, a New York City cab driver, led a museum curator and a reporter on a tour of historic Times Square. Strolling down Broadway, Mr. Faurer pointed out the sites of onetime attractions like the Planters store near 47th Street.


Faurer, 67, has come to know the city inside out in his 33 years as a cabby, but his memories of this long-gone version of Times Square go back even farther. His father, the photographer Louis Faurer, who died in 2001, was an ardent chronicler of New York street life, and often took Mark on his rounds as a child. In the 1960s the elder Faurer sometimes asked his son to join him as he shot a silent film called "Time Capsule," mainly on the streets of Times Square.

Read the complete article in The New York Times.

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Judith Keller Appointed Head of Getty's Department of Photography

Posted By Administration, Saturday, March 13, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

Judith Keller, the new head of the J. Paul Getty Museum's department of photographs, is looking toward Asia -- and beyond. She's been increasing the representation of images from Japan, China and Korea as the first step in expanding the scope of the Getty's collection, which has been focused on pre-1950 photography from Europe and America.


"We want to have a wider view of photography," says Keller, "and to see what artists working in photography are doing now." Along that line, she adds, "we also hope to build up our contemporary works."

Read the complete article in The Los Angeles Times.

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Review: Frederick Evans Exhibit at the Getty

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 19, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

Frederick Evans had an impeccable instinct for form. His platinum prints -- whether portraits, landscapes or studies of architecture -- are pristine, tonally rich and consistently beautiful.


Yet Evans valued information at least as much as inspiration (the Getty Museum show's slightly stiff title, "A Record of Emotion," perhaps alludes to this). He favored respectful distance over raw intimacy. When he did venture into that most personal terrain -- pure encounter with place, person or the spiritual self -- he produced some of the most profoundly moving photographs in the history of the medium.

Read the complete review in The Los Angeles Times.

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