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Magnum Photo Archive Moves to Harry Ransom Center

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 5, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

In the middle of December two trailer trucks left New York City bound for Austin, Tex., packed with a precious and unusual cargo: the entire collection of pictures amassed over more than half a century by the Magnum photo cooperative, whose members have been among the world's most distinguished photojournalists.


It is one of the most important photography archives of the 20th century, consisting of more than 180,000 images known as press prints, the kind of prints once made by the collective to circulate to magazines and newspapers. They are marked on their reverse sides with decades of historical impasto — stamps, stickers and writing chronicling their publication histories — that speaks to their role in helping to create the collective photo bank of modern culture.

Read the complete article in The New York Times.

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Victorian Photocollage Exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Posted By Administration, Friday, February 5, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

The rejiggering of history is fundamental to "Playing With Pictures: The Art of Victorian Photocollage," a seemingly modest, almost scattered, yet strangely reverberant exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.


"Playing With Pictures" refreshes your appreciation of the essential fuzziness of art history and of the collective, even osmotic nature of invention. It demonstrates how upper-class English women introduced cutout photographs into the albums of watercolors, sketches and writing that had long been an approved female leisure activity.

Read the complete review in The New York Times.

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Review: Soviet Photography of 1970s-80s at the Zimmerli Museum

Posted By Administration, Friday, January 22, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

American visitors to "Four Perspectives Through the Lens: Soviet Art Photography in the 1970s-1980s," an exhibition at the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, may be surprised to discover that photography was not officially considered art in the former Soviet Union. It was regarded as a documentary tool at the service of Communist Party propaganda.


Oddly, because of its outsider status, photography remained largely unregulated and uncensored. Soviet nonconformist artists made extremely clever, inventive use of the medium, crafting images that were formally experimental and socially aware.

The Zimmerli exhibition presents a selection of about 70 images by four important artists working in photography in the two decades before the fall of Communism.

Read the complete review in The New York Times.

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Magnum Photographer Dennis Stock is Dead at 81

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 14, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

Dennis Stock, 81, a celebrated photographer who helped immortalize Hollywood stars such as James Dean, captured the tension and mood of jazz musicians in their smoky habitat and catalogued the rebellious 1960s counterculture of bikers and hippies, died Jan. 11 at his home in Sarasota, Fla.


Magnum, the photographers' co-operative agency where Mr. Stock spent much of his career, confirmed the death but did not provide further details.

Read the complete obituary in The Washington Post.

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A Lost Archive? Billy Name's Negatives of Warhol's Factory Are Missing

Posted By Administration, Saturday, January 9, 2010
Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013

For seven years, beginning in late 1963, when Warhol gave him a 35-millimeter Honeywell Pentax camera, Billy Name was the resident photographer of the Factory, capturing the perpetual swirl of superstars, celebrities and hangers-on.


The pictures provide rare documentation of nearly every aspect of Warhol's world.

But sometime in the last two years, Mr. Name's archive of negatives went missing. Mr. Name left it in the care of a photography agent, Kevin Kushel, a former director of The Associated Press's photo archive, and whom Mr. Name said he had not been able to contact for months. The disappearance of the negatives has alarmed not just Mr. Name but also scholars, who describe the images as an important historical record of a pivotal time in art history.

Read the complete article in The New York Times.

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