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Photographs from Look Magazine at the Museum of the City of New York

Posted By Administration, Sunday, December 27, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
In the Museum of the City of New York's smartly packaged book and exhibition "Only in New York: Photographs From Look Magazine," you can see how one publication catered to voracious consumers of images.

Look's founding editor and publisher, Gardner Cowles, created it in 1937, to meet what the magazine called "the tremendous unfilled demand for extraordinary news and feature pictures."

Look, in circulation until 1971, was modeled on European magazines like the French Vu. It was more mainstream than Vogue and Harper's Bazaar, more photo driven than Life, and more New York-centric than all of them.

Read the complete review in The New York Times.

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California Photographer Larry Sultan Dies at 63

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, December 16, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

Larry Sultan, a highly influential California photographer whose 1977 collaboration, "Evidence" — a book made up solely of pictures culled from vast industrial and government archives — became a watershed in the history of art photography, died on Sunday at his home in Greenbrae, Calif. He was 63.


Along with other artwork using vernacular photographs, like that of Michael Lesy in his book "Wisconsin Death Trip" and of Richard Prince, "Evidence," first shown at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, opened broad new avenues for photography that have since been explored by major museums and by artists like Christian Boltanski and Carrie Mae Weems.

Read the complete obituary in The New York Times.

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Brett Weston Exhibition at the Currier Museum of Art

Posted By Administration, Friday, November 13, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

"Brett Weston: Out of the Shadow'' is a title with two meanings.


The first meaning refers to family and reputation. Brett Weston (1911-93) was the son of Edward Weston, one of the great photographers of the 20th century. The younger Weston was very good, but not that good.

As the high caliber of the early work at the Currier Museum of Art shows, Weston was a photographic prodigy. "He is doing better work at fourteen than I did at thirty,'' his father noted.

A picture like "Dune, Oceano,'' from 1934, with its curving overlay of darkness upon sand, indicates the other significance of shadow in the title. It's quite literal. Weston loved light's absence. Contrast wasn't so much a technical device he employed as a defining principle of his art. For him, shadow wasn't just light absent but light negated.

Read the complete review in The Boston Globe.

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Boston Exhibit Commemorates Fall of the Berlin Wall

Posted By Administration, Friday, November 13, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

When the Berlin Wall fell it was as if a John le Carré novel had suddenly been turned inside out and staged as a giant party. One could almost imagine Smiley actually smiling.


Watched worldwide, the party took place at what had been the starkest flash point between East and West. An event that had previously seemed unimaginable now looks inevitable in retrospect. (Consistency is not a retrospective virtue.) There's never been anything quite like Nov. 9, 1989.

A vivid sense of the joy, the strangeness, and, paradoxical though it might sound, the everydayness of the fall of the wall is to be found in abundance in "Moments of Time 1989/1990,'' which runs at the Goethe-Institut Boston through Dec. 18.

Read the complete review in The Boston Globe.

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Review of "New Photography" Exhibits at the Met, MoMA, and Hunter College

Posted By Administration, Friday, November 13, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

Back when Andreas Gursky was on the rise, the art world buzzed about the supposedly unfair advantages of digital photography. Photoshop and other computer manipulations were seen as performance-enhancing drugs, an impression fostered by Mr. Gursky's gargantuan, hyperdetailed prints.


We have since learned that these processes need not poison the medium. Some young photographers have made a point of going digital in transparent ways. Others have disappeared into the darkroom, emerging with works that bear legitimizing traces of chemicals. Abstract photographs are everywhere, sidestepping the whole truth-in-representation issue.

Three current shows outline the manifold choices available to contemporary photographers.

Read the complete review in The New York Times.

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