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Joni Sternbach Revives the Tintype Process at The Peabody Essex Museum

Posted By Administration, Thursday, May 28, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
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Joni Sternbach has perfected a form of time travel. To get from present to past she uses nothing more complicated than surfboards and tintypes.


Surfboards you know about. Tintypes? They were a popular 19th-century photographic process that printed an image on metal, most often iron or steel (Sternbach uses aluminum).

Sternbach photographs surfers posing with their boards and prints the results as tintypes. In fact, she takes a portable darkroom to the beach and develops her images right there. "SurfLand: Photographs by Joni Sternbach" at The Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, includes forty-seven examples along with two dozen vintage tintypes.

Read the complete review in The Boston Globe.


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San Francisco Photographer Benjamen Chinn dies at 87

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, May 27, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

Benjamen Chinn, a Chinese-American photographer who won acclaim for his photographs of San Francisco's Chinatown, died April 25 at age 87.


Often photographing from the doorway of his home in Chinatown, Chinn began training his camera on his neighborhood in the late 1930s, but his most productive years were from 1947-1949 while he was studying at what is now the San Francisco Art Institute.

Read a full obituary in The Los Angeles Times.

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Photograms by Walead Beshty at the Hirshhorn

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, May 26, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
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The art of Walead Beshty attempts to find a way between the anti-aesthetic and the emptily aesthetic -- without simply filling a mediocre middle. A new show at the Hirshhorn features 36 wo

rks by the British-born, Yale-trained, Los Angeles-based 32-year-old.


On first encounter, Beshty's 11 photograms -- images made by exposing photographic paper directly to light -- look like easy-on-the-eyes abstraction. Stripes and wedges of color, in shades of blue, green, red, yellow, cyan and magenta, work their way up large sheets of paper.

Read the complete review in The Washington Post.


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Two London Exhibits Examine Gerhard Richter's Relationship to Photography

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, May 26, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
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The Photographers' Gallery asks us to consider the photograph as object. We are asked to appreciate that some artists do things like expose photographs under water, or purposely damage their prints and negatives or even (as in one of Andy Warhol's less exciting interventions) literally stitch pictures together in a hopeless attempt to make them less dull.


Hidden away on the top floor of the gallery are 10 "Overpainted Photographs" by the German contemporary artist Gerhard Richter. As a selection, they are haphazard, but the opportunity to see any of these brilliant little things is too good to miss.

Read the complete review in The Financial Times.


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Review: Jaromír Funke and Avant-Garde Photography at the National Gallery

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, May 26, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
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The Washington Post's Blake Gopnik reviews "Jaromír Funke and the Amateur Avant-Garde" at the National Gallery of Art.


Jaromír Funke, born in 1896 in the Czech town of Kolin, started taking pictures in the early 1920s, as part of his era's flourishing amateur photography movement. Most amateurs in the newly independent Czechoslovakia were dedicated to perfecting photographic craft and to making attractive, unchallenging, "poetic" work. Funke, a law student, started out there, too: He could do soft focus as well as anyone. What makes him worthy of a National Gallery show, however, is his precocious conversion to the tougher ideals of photographic modernism, as perfected at the Bauhaus in Germany and around Alfred Stieglitz in the United States.

Read the complete review in The Washington Post.


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