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Robert Frank's "The Americans" Opens at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Posted By Administration, Sunday, September 27, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
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"America, Captured in a Flash" Like probably a zillion other school kids, "My country tears of thee" was the way I understood the first line of "America." Maybe that's the way the Swiss-born photographer Robert Frank heard it too when he came to the United States from Europe in 1947, at 22, with English his second, third or fourth language.


Sadness seems to trickle through the 83 photographs in his classic 1959 book, "The Americans," his disturbed and mournful song-of-the-road portrait of a new homeland and the subject of a 50th-anniversary exhibition now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Read the complete review in the New York Times.


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170 Years After Its Birth, Photography Must Refocus on Its Identity for the Future

Posted By Administration, Sunday, September 27, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

The current media obsession with the financial troubles of the celebrity photographer Annie Leibovitz leads the Washington Post's Blake Gopnik to consider the dynamic between commerce and photography.


News of Leibovitz's finances has set me to thinking about one peculiar aspect of her work: that art lovers, both fans and foes, have had the chance to form opinions of it. Of all media, only photography would get an art critic talking about someone from the commercial side of the tracks. Only a photographer would make a fortune from pictures in magazines, but also see the same images on museum walls. Only photographs so easily cross over between high and low.

Read the complete article in The Washington Post.

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Dog Days of Bogotá by Alec Soth at MassArt

Posted By Administration, Sunday, September 27, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

A revolver sits on a desk. Its presence there takes a moment to register, since the room has such a high ceiling and the wall behind the desk (which dominates the photograph you're looking at) is bare but for a clock and a small image of a saint.


Something strange is going on here - revolver? saint? - the strangest thing of all is the juxtaposition seems almost normal. This is the most remarkable aspect of the exhibition "Dog Days Bogotá by Alec Soth" at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design's Stephen D. Paine Gallery. Soth manages to make the Colombian city seem so familiar in its strangeness, and vice versa.

Read the complete review in The Boston Globe.

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Controversy Over Pending Auction of Polaroid Collection Photographs

Posted By Administration, Sunday, September 27, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

In the late 1960s, the Polaroid Corp. had an interesting idea. The company recruited the world's best-known photographers, such as Ansel Adams, William Wegman, and Andy Warhol, provided them with free film and studio space, and said: Have a ball. When you are finished, please give us a few prints, which we will include in our corporate collection.


Four decades later, the Polaroid Collection has 16,000 prints by 120 recognized masters. It's not just Polaroids. Some of the pictures, by Margaret Bourke-White, Edward Weston, and Dorothea Lange, hung in Polaroid founder Edwin Land's library. Sotheby's has chosen 1,300 prints from the collection, valued between $7 million and $11 million, and plans to auction them off next spring.

"Hey, wait a minute!'' is the widespread reaction of some photographers and former Polaroid employees blindsided by the proposed sale.

Click here for more information.

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Guatemalan Photographer Luis González Palma at Art Institute of Boston

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 25, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

There's no question that Luis González Palma's photographs are beautiful. Many of the images in his two shows at the Art Institute of Boston (one at the school's Main Gallery, the other in Porter Square) float over grounds of red paper covered in gold leaf. They are lush, imagistic, and brooding.


Yet all that beauty has a fevered, hallucinatory quality that ultimately feels unanchored.
Born in Guatemala, González Palma is best known for portraits of indigenous people in his native country. Those images wrestle with issues of colonialism and power. His subjects gaze directly at the camera, claiming their humanity.

Read the complete review in The Boston Globe.




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