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Photojournalist Lynsey Addario Awarded MacArthur Genius Grant

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 25, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
Istanbul-based photojournalist Lynsey Addario is among the winners of the 2009 MacArthur Fellowships.
Paying $500,000 over five years, the no-strings-attached fellowships are among the largest grants given to support creative work. Addario is the only photographer among the 24 grant winners announced Tuesday. Fewer than ten photographers have been awarded MacArthur Fellowships since the program started in 1981.

The grant process is open to U.S. citizens or residents who must be nominated. Addario, 36, is a U.S. citizen.

Addario has won numerous honors for her coverage of hotspots such as Afghanistan, Iraq, Darfur, Congo and Saudi Arabia.

Read the complete article in Photo District News.

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Rock Musician Designs Stereoscopic Viewer for Book on Early Photography

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 25, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

Guitarist Brian May, formerly of Queen, helped design a new plastic stereoscopic viewer for an upcoming publication on the nineteenth-century photographer T.R. Williams.


S B Weston, a plastic injection moulding company based in Sunbury-on-Thames, has been working on the production of a 3D stereoscopic viewer with Queen guitarist Brian May, who designed the instrument.

The injection moulded viewer will accompany May's second book, co-written with photo-historian Elena Vidal, titled 'A Village Lost and Found', which will be available mid-October.

The book features a series of cards created by pioneering 1850s stereoscopic photographer T R Williams, whose work May has been researching for the past 30 years.

Read the complete article in Plastics & Rubber Weekly.

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Exhibit on Lisette Model and Her Students at Mt. Holyoke

Posted By Administration, Thursday, September 24, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

What made Lisette Model's reputation was a series of photographs she took on the French Riviera in the 1930s. They offered an unsparing view of well-fed self-indulgence - the good life as grotesquerie.


There is no small irony in Model's becoming famous in such a fashion. So much of the force of her photographs stems from a refusal to moralize or judge.

The only complaint to make about "Lisette Model and Her Successors'' at the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum is that Model's own images make up barely a fifth of the 121 photographs in it. Model was a legendary teacher, and along with her own work the show includes pictures from 11 of her pupils.

Read the complete review in The Boston Globe.

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Irving Penn's Photographs of the Working Class at the Getty

Posted By Administration, Saturday, September 19, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

A 1950 photograph by Irving Penn shows a London seamstress with the tools of her trade — thread, pins, tape measure, fabric — her right hand casually tucked inside one pocket, her other shrouded inside a partially sewn sleeve.


The picture is distinctive partly for the figure's setting, a kind of atmospheric visual "nowhere" that Penn was instrumental in popularizing as a staple of fashion photography.

The Getty exhibition, "Irving Penn: Small Trades," is filled with black-and-white photographs like this, one of 252 in a set Penn assembled. The Getty acquired the set last year, and it's having its debut in the show.

Read the complete review in The Los Angeles Times.

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Parisian Photographer, Willy Ronis, Dies at 99

Posted By Administration, Saturday, September 19, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

Willy Ronis, whose lyric black-and-white photographs of courting couples, busy street scenes and children at play lent a gentle but enduring mystique to postwar, working-class Paris, died in Paris on Saturday. He was 99.


Mr. Ronis, like his colleagues Robert Doisneau, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Brassaï, wandered the streets of Paris, open to serendipity, which usually found him. His carefully composed images showed ordinary people doing ordinary things, unaware that immortality was just a camera click away.

Read the complete obituary in The New York Times.

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