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Review: Gay Icons at the National Portrait Gallery, London

Posted By Turner Uligian, Wednesday, August 12, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

ImageWe knew, after the initial flurry of controversy, that there was going to be no Judy, no Dusty, no Barbra, no Liza. Gay Icons, the exhibition, would recast the notion of what a gay icon was, and those who expected divas with fabulous voices, frocks, pill addictions and capacities to suffer were in for disappointment.


A ten-strong panel of the gay great and good would choose their "icons". Their choices, on paper, sounded dull — personal icons rather than collective ones; cliquey and select.

Yet the exhibition, with a wonderful, accompanying hardback book, is colourful, intimate and moving.

Read the complete review in The Times UK.


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Thomas Ruff Exhibit at Vienna's Kunsthalle

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 12, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
Image

The closer you get to Thomas Ruff's blown-up prints, the less they seem to say. Mr. Ruff's lens hovers only on the surfaces of things, and to our consternation, no deeper.


The German photographer's latest works on show -- close-ups of Saturn's candy-colored moons and rings, wiry depictions of electromagnetic force fields -- remind of his large portraits, where a shadowless light flattens each face to the point that it begins to look like a mask. Despite the meticulous capture of each hair, pore and wrinkle, the portrait remains startlingly cool and neutral -- and progressively less trustworthy.

Read the complete review in The Wall Street Journal.


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Susan Hiller's J. Street Project at San Francisco's Contemporary Jewish Museum

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

Susan Hiller's "The J. Street Project" demonstrates the capacity of a good idea to draw alarming cumulative power from ostensibly matter-of-fact material.


During an artist's residency in Berlin, Hiller, an American long based in London, happened upon Judenstrasse - Jews Street - and found the name troubling enough that she set about three years of travel throughout Germany to document every street and place name containing the prefix Juden-.

"The J. Street Project" resulted: an "index" of 303 color photographs, plus a map keyed to the various place names, and a slightly more than hourlong color video.

Read the complete review in The San Francisco Chronicle.

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Downturn in Print Media Hurting Photojournalists

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

When photojournalists and their admirers gather in southern France at the end of August for Visa pour l'Image, the annual celebration of their craft, many practitioners may well be wondering how much longer they can scrape by.


Newspapers and magazines are cutting back sharply on picture budgets or going out of business altogether, and television stations have cut back on news coverage in favor of less costly fare. Pictures and video shot by amateurs on cellphones are posted to Web sites minutes after events occur. Photographers trying to make a living from shooting the news are calling it a crisis.

Read the complete article in The New York Times.

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Milton Rogovin, "Voices Silenced, Faces Preserved"

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

On the wall above the kitchen table in Milton Rogovin's modest home here hangs a handwritten sign listing some of the notable events of 1909: Geronimo's death in prison; the first full year of production for Ford's Model T; the founding of what was to become the N.A.A.C.P.; the birth in New York City of Milton Rogovin, who, approaching 100, is one of the country's most revered social-documentary photographers.


Mr. Rogovin was an optometrist whose business was decimated and his children shunned after he refused to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1958.

Read the complete article in The New York Times.

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