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Marcey Jacobson, a Photographer Inspired by Mexico, Dies at 97

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

Marcey Jacobson, a self-taught photographer from New York City who spent decades in the southern Mexican highlands documenting the lives of the indigenous Indian peoples, died on July 26 in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Mexico, in the state of Chiapas. She was 97.


Ms. Jacobson was eking out a living in New York City doing mechanical drafting when she first visited San Cristóbal in 1956, intending only a short stay. Instead she found a place she called "the solution to everything," and, with her companion, Janet Marren, a painter, settled there for the rest of her life.

Read Jacobson's obituary in The New York Times.

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Bennington Photo Exhibit Focuses on Concepts of Time and Space

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, July 29, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

The relationship between vision and location underlies "The Quality of Place: Photography, Space and Specificity,'' which runs at the Bennington Museum through Aug. 30.


The show consists of more than 80 photographs, as well as three dozen stereographs, 21 postcards, and a family album. As the variety of visual items indicates, "The Quality of Place'' takes an eclectic approach to its subject. There is, for instance, the matter of the show's title. It refers, in effect, to the quality of two places: Bennington and environs, and everywhere else. The everywhere else includes Egypt, Yosemite, Greece, Uzbekistan, and New York City.

The exhibition features photographs by Ansel Adams, Lee Friedlander, Lewis Hines, Clara Sipprell, Alfred Stieglitz, and others.

Read the complete review in The Boston Globe.

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Fight Escalates over Licensing Rights between Wikipedia and London's National Portrait Gallery

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, July 29, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013

There's a battle of he said-she said brewing between Britain's National Portrait Gallery and Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia whom the museum has accused of theivery.


Two weeks ago, the museum threatened legal action against Derrick Coetzee, a Wikipedia volunteer who was allegedly able to "de-scramble" high-resolution images of a number of works copyrighted by the NPG, which is in the middle of a large and expensive program to digitize its entire collection. The museum said they had no interest in suing Wikipedia, and even now remain hopeful that the matter can be settled outside of court.

Read the complete article at the BBC News.

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Vince Aletti reviews David Goldblatt at the New Museum, NYC

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, July 29, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
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The South African photographer David Goldblatt calls himself "an unlicensed, self-appointed social critic" of his country and compatriots, "sometimes harsh, but not without love."


That description will hardly prepare you for the subtlety and incisiveness of his work. "Intersections Intersected," the survey that now fills two floors of the New Museum, ranges from black-and-white pictures made in 1964, at the beginning of Goldblatt's career, to color photographs taken over the past few years.

Read the complete review in The New Yorker.


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Review: André Kertész at the Photographers Gallery, London

Posted By Administration, Monday, July 27, 2009
Updated: Friday, December 27, 2013
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The Guardian reviews exhibition that focuses on André Kertész's photographic celebration of the joy of the written word.


One of my favourite André Kertész photographs shows two young men sitting with their backs to a tree, each absorbed in a book. Both are wearing glasses; both use their thighs as a lectern; the one facing forwards is black, the other, in profile (a dead ringer for Woody Allen), is white. Their proximity suggests they know each other and are friends. And given the time and place of the composition, the photo could serve as an icon of the civil rights movement – racial harmony as observed in Washington Square, New York City, 1969.

Read the complete review in The Guardian.

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